Edana Beauvais

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“Discursive Equality”

 Dissertation Abstract

I begin my dissertation by offering a theoretical account of the kind of equality (or empowered inclusion) required for deliberation to achieve its normative functions. I describe the regulative ideal of discursive equality, comprised of the twin values of universal opportunity for participation, and equitable influence in discursive processes. Building on Young’s notion of internal exclusion, I develop a theoretical account of discursive inequality, which refers to when socio-psychological features of the lifeworld contribute to internal exclusion. I identify two general species of discursive inequality: discursive inequities and norm-conditional inclusion, and describe how they contribute to various faces of oppression identified by Young.

My normative theory informs my empirical analysis. I use data from my original survey experiment to show how discursive inequities structure processes of argumentation, and contribute to the internal exclusion of women speakers. Respondents were asked their opinion on a non-salient policy question, and regardless of their response were randomly assigned to read a counter argument from either a man or woman speaker. I find that, ceteris paribus, respondents indicate significantly greater willingness to revise their initial position after hearing a counter argument from a man than from a woman. I also include a measure of self-esteem (measured by scores on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) and implicit associations (using an original Implicit Association Test I developed) to see how gendered variation in self-esteem and gender stereotypes moderate the likelihood a respondent revises their position after learning about a man’s or woman’s identical counter position.

Supervisor and Committee

·      Mark Warren, University of British Columbia (Supervisor)

·      Andrew Owen, University of British Columbia

·      Simone Chambers, University of California, Irvine

Research Keywords

deliberation; democratic theory; Canadian politics; gender; feminism; multiculturalism; civil society; inter-group deliberation; political psychology; experiments

Email

edana.beauvais@alumni.ubc.ca

About

Edana Beauvais is a PhD candidate in UBC’s Department of Political Science, majoring in political theory and Canadian politics. Broadly speaking, Edana is interested in the way that social inequalities impact human psychology and shape communication, and what this means for using public deliberation to inform collective decision-making, and using active learning techniques in teaching political science. Edana has had diverse work experience both inside her department at UBC (teaching, research), as well as outside of her department (working as a freelance writer, facilitating a citizens’ assembly). In her spare time Edana enjoys traveling, road biking, skiing, training her dog, and yoga.

Education

Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science, University of British Columbia (2010-present, December 2016 defense)

Simon Fraser University: “Introduction to Time Series Analysis” (Summer course, taught by Mark Pickup) (2015)

Inter-Consortium for Political and Social Research: “Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research” (2014)

Courses taken: “Regression II (Regression Diagnostics),” and “Multi-Level Modelling”

Berlin Summer School in Social Sciences: “Linking Theory and Methodology” (2013)

Canadian Summer School in Berlin: “Rethinking Memory and National Identity” (2011)

M.A. in Political Science, University of British Columbia (2009-2010)

H.B.A. in Political Science and Sociology, University of Toronto (2004-2008)

Peer Reviewed Publications

Beauvais, Edana. “Political Communication and the Political Use of Language.” The Informed Citizens Guide to Elections: Electioneering Based on Rule of Law. Spec. issue of Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law (Spring 2015). Web and print.

Beauvais, Edana. 2016 (accepted). “Deliberation and Equality.” Oxford Handbook of Deliberative Democracy. Oxford University Press: Oxford, UK.

Beauvais, Edana and Yaylaci, Sule. 2016 (accepted). “The Role of Social Group Membership on Classroom Participation.” PS: Political Science and Politics.

Beauvais, Edana and Bächtiger, André. 2016 (accepted). “Taking the Goals of Deliberation Seriously: A Differentiated View on Equality and Equity in Deliberative Designs and Processes.” Journal of Public Deliberation.

Beauvais, Edana and Warren, Mark. 2016 (revise and resubmit) “Can Citizens’ Assemblies Deepen Urban Democracy?” European Journal of Political Research.

Working Papers

Beauvais, Edana. “Discursive Inequity: How Gender Stereotypes and Gendered Self-Esteem Impact Argumentation.”

·      Paper prepared for the 2016 American Political Science Association Conference, “The Psychology of Deliberating Groups” panel (originally entitled “Social Stereotypes and the Flow of Ideas in Political Deliberation”).

Beauvais, Edana. “Stereotyping, Cognition, and Deliberative Democratic Theory: The Search for Discursive Equality.”

·       Winner of the Stankiewicz Prize Award (“Best political theory paper”), given by the department of political science, UBC

·       An earlier draft was presented at the 2015 Western Political Science Association Conference

Beauvais, Edana, Mann, Elizabeth, and Lore, Grace. “Continental Gender Divide: Abortion Attitudes in the United States and Canada”

·      Presented at the 2016 Canadian Political Science Association Conference, the “Health Regulation” panel

Beauvais, Edana and Yaylaci, Sule. “The Role of Conversational Dynamics and Facilitators in Promoting Empathy in Small-Group Deliberation.”

·      Presented at the 2016 Canadian Political Science Association Conference, the “Youth Participation” panel

Beauvais, Edana and Yaylaci, Sule. “Silence in the Classroom: Exploring the Impact of Student and Instructor Attributes on Student Participation.”

·      An earlier draft presented at the 2014 American Political Science Association Conference, the “Assessing Diversities in the Classroom” panel

 

Select Non-Peer Reviewed Publications

Beauvais, Edana and Dave Moscrop. 23 October 2015. “This is how Canada should pursue electoral reform.”  The Ottawa Citizen.

Beauvais, Edana. 7 August 2015. “Op-Ed: Elizabeth May won by just being in the room.”  The Ottawa Citizen.

Beauvais, Edana and David Moscrop. 10 June 2015. “Op-ed: Stop treating women’s soccer as second-class soccer.”  The Ottawa Citizen.

Lore, Grace, Edana Beauvais, and Allison James-Lomax. 25 November 2014. “Opinion: Elections yield mixed results for women.” The Vancouver Sun.

Beauvais, Edana. 2011. “Talking Across Boundaries: Interracial Deliberation.” UBC Master’s Thesis.

Current Research Projects

Challenging Discursive Equality: How Pre-Cognitive Judgements Shape Discourse (2015-present)

·       A survey experiment testing whether gender impacts the likelihood of accepting counterarguments.
·       Funded in part by an UBC Arts Graduate Student Research Award (2015), and by a UBC Doctoral Research Fund Award (2013)

Study of the Grandview-Woodland Citizens’ Assembly, with Mark Warren (2014-present)

·       A three-wave survey of the participants who were involved in the GW Citizens’ Assembly on neighbourhood planning. We also surveyed members of the public who volunteered but were not selected to participate (taking advantage of the random selection sortation mechanism makes this a natural experiment).

Study of Student Participation and Group Dynamics, with Sule Yaylaci (2013-present)

·       A large-n (700 participants) survey study of student participation in university tutorials.
·       Funded by an UBC Arts Instructional Support and Information Technology (ISIT) Research Funding Grant (2013)

Select Conference Presentations

Paper Presenter. September 2016. “Social Stereotypes and the Flow of Ideas in Political Deliberation.” American Political Science Association Conference.

Non-Presenting co-author for a Paper Presentation (with André Bächtiger). September 2016. “Equality and Equity in Deliberative Design.” American Political Science Association Conference.

Paper presenter (with Şule Yaylaci). June 2016. “The Role of Conversational Dynamics and Facilitators in Promoting Empathy in Small-Group Deliberation.” Canadian Political Science Association Conference.

Paper presenter (with Elizabeth Mann & Grace Lore). June 2016. “Continental Gender Divide: Abortion Attitudes in the United States and Canada.” Canadian Political Science Association Conference.

Paper presenter (with Mark Warren). September 2015. “Can Citizens’ Assemblies Deepen Urban Democracy?” American Political Science Association Conference.

Paper presenter (with Şule Yaylaci). September 2015. “Promoting Voice: Motivating Student Participation in Diverse Classrooms” American Political Science Association Conference.

Paper presenter. June 2015. “A Democratic Experiment in Municipal planning: The Citizens’ Assembly on the Grandview-Woodland Community Plan.” Canadian Political Science Association Conference.

Paper presenter. April 2015. “Stereotyping, Discourse, and Speaker Status: From Social Psychology to Democratic Theory.” Western Political Science Association Conference.

Panel presenter. August 2014. “The Participedia Project: A New Approach to Understanding Democratic Innovations.” American Political Science Association Conference.

Paper presenter. July 2014. “Ascribed Status, Stereotypes, and Prototype Effects: Consequences for Deliberative Democratic Theory.” International Political Science Association.

Scholarships and Distinctions:

  • UBC Arts Graduate Student Research Award (2015)
  • Stankiewicz Prize Award (“Best political theory paper”), Department of Political Science, UBC (2014)
  • Clifford C. Clogg Scholarship for tuition at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) (July-August 2014)
  • SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship (September 2012-present)
  • UBC Four-Year-Fellowship (September 2010-present)
  • UBC Arts Instructional Support and Information Technology (ISIT) Research Funding Grant (2013)
  • UBC Doctoral Research Fund (2013)

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