Courses

Below find all courses that will be offered in our Department for Summer 2017 & Winter 2016-2017.

Note:

  • courses are subject to change; please check the Student Service Centre for the most up to date schedule.
  • POLI 360A (Job) is WRITING-INTENSIVE
    • this does not mean a significantly higher workload, it just means lots of practice writing and lots of feedback.
    • we recommend that students take only one WI course per year.
  • if you have any questions, please contact Undergraduate Academic Advisor at 604.822.5969 or the Political Science office at 604.822.6079

SUMMER COURSES 2017


POLI 100 (3)   INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS

Section 921   1st Term   T TH   09:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Stewart Prest (sprest@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

What are power and justice, and how do we reconcile the two in contemporary society? How do we decide how to govern ourselves? This course asks and attempts to answer these and other central questions in the study of political science today. In doing so, it provides an overview of key concepts, institutions, and challenges in Western politics. Students will also encounter aspects of the four areas studied in political science at UBC: Political Theory, Comparative Politics, Canadian Politics, and International Relations.

Learning in this course consists of a combination of lectures, readings, multimedia presentations, small and large group discussions, assignments, and exams. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to identify, analyze, and understand a variety of political problems facing Canadians and the world, and will have experience applying the core concepts and methods of political science to practical situations of day-to-day politics.

 

POLI 101 (3)   THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

Section 951   2nd Term   M W   09:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Matthew Byrne (matthew.byrne@alumni.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course introduces students to the political institutions of the Canadian state and the actors that operate within them. Some of the topics include parliament, federalism, the constitution, and electoral systems. Current events and controversies will inform class discussions. Developing an understanding of Canada’s political institutions and their underlying logic will help students to better engage the political processes of which they are a part. Students will also develop a foundation of knowledge which will prepare them for advanced study in political science.


POLI 110 (3)   INVESTIGATING POLITICS: AN INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC POLITICAL ANALYSIS 

Section 921   1st Term   M W   13:00 – 16:00

Instructor: Charles Breton (cbreton@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course prepares students to engage with the field of political science by introducing them to the basic logic and tools used by political scientists to understand and explain the political world. The course will teach students how political scientists ask answerable questions; how we define key political concepts; how we formulate hypotheses and theories about political dynamics; how we measure the phenomena we want to study; how we think about and assess relationships of cause-and-effect; and how we report our findings to the world. We will consider these issues by examining how political scientists have investigated major questions in domestic and international affairs, such as why ethnic diversity sometimes leads to civil war, whether international intervention can bring about democracy, and how we can determine which country has the best healthcare policies


POLI 240 (3)   CURRENTS OF POLITICAL THOUGHT

Section 921   1st Term T TH   14:00 – 15:00

Instructor: Jennifer Gagnon (jennifer.gagnon@ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This courses provides students with an introduction to the field of political theory through a critical exploration of foundational authors, texts, and ideas in the tradition of western political thought. We will focus on three historical periods, represented by the sections on Athens and the Polis, Renaissance and Revolution, and Modernity and its Discontents. Together, we will read works of political theory and political literature by Plato (Republic), Euripides (the Bacchae), Machiavelli (The Prince and The Discourses), Hobbes (The Leviathan), Rousseau (Discourse on Inequality and On the Social Contract), Nietzsche (On the Genealogy of Morals), and Mary Shelley (Frankenstein). We will focus on developing student’s spoken, written, and interpretive skills by emphasizing critical thinking and close-analysis of the readings with an eye towards understanding our present predicament and contemporary political issues.

 

POLI 260 (3)   INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS

Section 951   2nd Term   T TH   09:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Justin Alger (algerj@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of Global Politics (or International Relations).  Accordingly, the course will examine international relations theory, international security and conflict management, the evolution and future of the international economy, development, the role of institutions and non-state actors, globalization, and the politics of climate change.  The course material is oriented toward issues of contemporary and future relevance, and students will be expected to incorporate current issues into their work.

 

POLI 308B (3)   ISSUES IN CANADIAN POLITICS (CSDI: Summer Institute for Future Legislators)

Section 951   2nd Term  

Instructor: Gerald Baier (gerald.baier@ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course blends academic discussion, practitioner insight, and experiential learning to give students an understanding of both the theoretical and practical aspects of legislatures in Canadian democracy. Topics include Legislatures & Legislative Life, Parliamentary Relationships, The Ethical Politician, Working in the House, Communications, Representation, Constituency Service, and Parliamentary Reform. We will explore the role of the individual Member of Parliament/Legislature in influencing legislation and decision making, and the relationship between political parties, individual legislators and the legislature. The major activities of the course involve the three weekend workshops of the Summer Institute for Future Legislators program.

This course has two essential components. The first is the weekend package (three weekends) that students will take alongside members of the wider community. This will take place both at UBC and at the provincial legislature in Victoria. Attendance during these are mandatory and participation is graded. The second is the academic portion which is only for those attending SIFL for UBC credit.

Dates for the Poli 308B seminar are: July 14th, 21st, 28th, and August 4th, from 10:00am to 1:00pm.

The program is run by the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions. Registration in this course is by application only. For more information, and to apply please go here: http://www.democracy.arts.ubc.ca/summer-institute/ or contact CSDI Program Manager, Rebecca Monnerat (rebecca.monnerat@ubc.ca).

 

POLI 321A (3)   INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

Section 951   2nd Term   M W   13:00 – 16:00

Instructor: Yoel Kornreich (yoel.kornreich@gmail.com)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course presents an introduction to China’s political and economic development from 1949 to the present as well as the challenges that the leadership and average citizens face in China today. We begin with a review of China’s long-term trajectory and the particular dilemmas and traumas that China faced at the beginning of the 20th century. We then examine the contours of governance established under Mao’s reign, as well as the political cleavages undergirding the Cultural Revolution. The larger second half of the course focuses on the reform period that began nearly forty years ago, in the fall of 1978. Among the topics covered are China’s political institutions, economy, legal system, education and health systems, corruption, environmental protection, media, Internet, political participation and political reform.

 

POLI 333B (3)   ISSUES IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS: MEDIA AND POLITICS

Section 921   1st Term   T TH   09:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Dominik Stecula (dstecu@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

Mass media play an increasingly important role in politics, and are a central feature of modern representative democracy. Much of our exposure to politics, as well as other important information, comes not from direct experience, but from stories mediated by the press. This course provides an introduction to the themes in the study of mass media and politics, a thriving field of academic research at the time when the media landscape is undergoing immense changes driven by technological progress.

In this course, we will examine the interactions between media and political institutions, actors and processes, in light of theories of journalism, communication and political practice. A major objective of this course is to learn to think in systematic and nuanced ways about the media’s coverage of the political world instead of relying on grotesque simplifications that pervade public thinking about the media and their role in politics. We will carefully examine what the media do well and where they fail. Some of the topics explored in this course include: what role do the media play in a democracy?, how do the media cover politics?, how do the media affect public opinion?, how do they affect policymakers?, are the media biased?, are social media news media?, among others.

The course will focus primarily on the United States and therefore assumes the basic knowledge of the American political system.

 

POLI 464C (3)   PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Section 921   1st Term    M W   09:30 – 12:30

Instructor: Robert Farkasch (robertfa@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course studies the relationship between politics and economics in order to understand the process of late development -both theoretically and empirically. Specifically, we will study questions such as: How important are political institutions to economic development and what role do they play? How does economics affect political institutions and government policies? Why do inefficient and/or harmful institutions survive? Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. We will also examine the economic effects of different growth strategies in Latin America, Africa and East Asia, and investigate some of the pitfalls of natural resource wealth and the difficulties of foreign aid.

__________________________________________
WINTER POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES 2016-17

POLI 100 (3)        INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS     

Section 001         1st Term T R  11:00 – 12:30
Section 003         2nd Term T R 15:30 – 17:00

Instructor: Jennifer Gagnon
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites:
none

What is power? What is justice? What does it mean to be free? What is the role of violence in politics? How do I make sense of politics? These are powerful questions that influence how we think about and shape politics. This class will introduce students to the themes and dilemmas of politics. Together, we will learn how all of us as citizens can create change in the world through seeing problems, critical reflection, and informed action. We will examine different understandings of democratic citizenship in historical perspective, as well as identify problems in global citizenship and analyze how effective citizen action can occur both at home and on a global level. We will critique and respond to works by: Plato, Hannah Arendt, Frantz Fanon, Mike Davis, and more. Students will be expected to apply their learning as they identify traits and actions of good citizens in their college courses, in their homes, in their communities, and in our shared world. Planned course activities will challenge students to identify ways that they, either acting in groups or as individuals, can change and improve our world. Together, we will embrace practices of engaged citizenship.

Note: POLI 100 will be a prerequisite for all 200-level Political Science courses.

 

POLI 100 (3)        INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS     

Section 004         2nd Term T R 12:30 – 14:00

Instructor: TBA
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites:

Note: POLI 100 will be a prerequisite for all 200-level Political Science courses.

 

POLI 100 (3)        INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS                     

Section 002         1st Term  T R  14:00 – 15:30

Instructor: Bruce Baum
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites:

Political Science 100 will introduce you to the key concepts and ideas of Western politics, as well as the current challenges.  It is meant to provide you with the analytical tools necessary to study all four areas of political science at UBC: Political Theory, Comparative Politics, International Relations, and Canadian Politics. The course consists of a combination of lectures, group discussions and readings. Each week you will be required to attend two lectures and one discussion group.

Our overall organizing theme will be the ways in which politics involves interrelated struggles for power and justice. Struggles for power – and the uses of power – often seem to obscure or preclude claims of justice; yet the pursuit of justice – even in the most democratic and egalitarian setting possible – always involves issues of power (what it is; who should wield it or how it should be shared; how it should be exercised). With this broad themes in mind the course is organized into five parts: I. Power, Justice, and Politics; II. The Concept of Power;III. Modern Political Ideologies; IV. The Modern (Democratic) State;V. Global Politics.

In order to examine how all of these concepts in western politics make a difference in our daily political life, the discussion group seminars will use contemporary case studies to make the broader themes specific, concrete and relevant.

Note: POLI 100 will be a prerequisite for all 200-level Political Science courses.

 

POLI 100 (3)        INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS

Section 227         1st Term   M-W-F  9:00 – 10:00
Section 228         1st Term   M-W-F  13:00 – 14:00

Instructor: Christopher Erickson
Required Texts:
The following book is required and available at the UBC Bookstore:
Garner, R., et al, Introduction to Politics Canadian ed, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2012
Other readings as assigned
Essays and Exams:
-Tutorial participation                        15%
-Midterm examination                        25%
-Essay                                                30%
-Final examination                              30%
Prerequisite:
None
Course Website:
None

Political Science 100 will introduce you to key concepts and ideas of western politics, as well as current challenges. It is meant to provide you with the analytical tools necessary to study political science at UBC. The course consists of a combination of lectures, group discussions and readings. Each week you will be required to attend 3 one-hour lectures and a one-hour tutorial group. We will begin with an introduction to some of the basic conceptual and theoretical tools you will require as a political scientist. We will then move on to a discussion of some of the important political systems and processes. The course will conclude with a look at politics between states. The study of politics must always keep its eye towards tangible, day-to-day, on the ground events and the discussion groups will in part work towards the practical application of the course material.

Note: POLI 100 will be a prerequisite for all 200-level Political Science courses.

 

POLI 101 (3)        THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA              

Section 001         1st Term  M-W-F  12:00 – 13:00
Section 227         2nd Term  M-W-F  11:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Allan Craigie
Required Texts:
TBA
Prerequisites:

The Canadian state presents a unique opportunity to explore politics within one of the world’s oldest constitutional democracies.  Canadian politics is not simply about winning elections.  Politics in Canada deals with the basic nature of what Canada is, who we are, and the type of society we want to live in.  The Government of Canada engages students in the exploration of government structures and political cleavages in Canada.  The State, Nationalism and Regionalism, Foreign Affairs, Elections and Political Parties are some of the topics covered.  Students will come away with a strong understanding of the Canadian context, as well as broader political themes, to prepare them for more advanced study within political science.


POLI 101 (3)        THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA  

Section 002         2nd Term  M-W-F  14:00 – 15:00

Instructor: Gerald Baier
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites:

This course examines the structure and operation of Canada’s political system. Understanding the logic of Canada’s institutions will help students to assume their roles as engaged democratic citizens. Class lectures will focus on the principles underlying Canada’s political system and a detailed explication of its rules and institutions. Current and historical events will be employed to illustrate these principles and concepts. Students can expect a number of short writing assignments, a term paper and a midterm and final examination.


POLI 101 (3)        THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

Section 099         1st Term  M-W-F  11:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Paul Kopas
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites:

The course introduces students to the basic principles, structures and practices of Canadian politics and government. The objective is to develop an understanding of the process of (mostly) national politics and of the relationship between the individual and the Canadian state. For students interested in further study of political science, it will provide a solid foundation on which to build. For those interested in a general knowledge of politics, it will reveal a full spectrum of the institutions and processes of politics thus enabling individuals to understand or engage their roles as citizens. Since this is an introductory course, some attention will be given to developing academic skills (such as research and writing) that are relevant across the university.


POLI 110 (3)        Investigating Politics: An Introduction to Scientific Political Analysis                                         

Section: 001  1st Term M-W-F  14:00 – 15:00

Instructor: Charles Breton
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course prepares students to engage with the field of political science by introducing them to the basic logic and tools used by political scientists to understand and explain the political world. The course will teach students how political scientists ask answerable questions; how we define key political concepts; how we formulate hypotheses and theories about political dynamics; how we measure the phenomena we want to study; how we think about and assess relationships of cause-and-effect; and how we report our findings to the world. We will consider these issues by examining how political scientists have investigated major questions in domestic and international affairs, such as why ethnic diversity sometimes leads to civil war, whether international intervention can bring about democracy, and how we can determine which country has the best healthcare policies.


POLI 110 (3)        Investigating Politics: An Introduction to Scientific Political Analysis

Section 002  2nd Term  T-R  11:00 – 12:30

Instructor: TBA
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites:

TBA


POLI 220 (3) INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Section 002         2nd Term  T R  12:30 – 14:00
Plus 1 one-hour discussion group

Instructor: Christopher Kam
Required Texts: Clark, William R., Matt Golder, Sona Nadenichek Golder. 2012, Principles Of Comparative Politics. 2nd Edition. Sage/CQ Press.
Essays and Exams:
TBA
Prerequisite:
POLI 100

Why are some countries democratic whereas others are dictatorships? Why are elected governments stable in some countries and unstable in others? Why does ethnic conflict flare up in some countries but not others? This course introduces students to the theories and methods that comparative political scientists use to understand questions and answer questions such as these.


POLI 240 (3)        CURRENTS OF POLITICAL THOUGHT

Section 002         1st Term  M-W-F  8:00 – 9:00
Section 003         2nd Term M-W-F  13:00 – 14:00
Plus 1 one-hour discussion group

Instructor: Christopher Erickson
Required Texts:

Sendak, Where The Wild Things Are (Harper Collins or Scholastic)
Plato, Republic (CDC Reeve trans., Hackett)
Hobbes, Leviathan (Norton Critical Edition)
Machiavelli, The Prince (Norton Critical Edition)
Locke, Political Writings (Norton Critical Edition)
Marx, The Communist Manifesto (Norton Critical Edition)
Nietzsche, The Genealogy of Morality (Cambridge U Press)
Other Readings As Assigned
All required texts are available through the UBC bookstore.
Course Evaluation:

Midterm Examination             20%
Written Assignment                30%
Final Examination                   40%
Participation                            10%
Prerequisite:
Poli 100
Course Website: none

This course will provide an introduction to some of the major figures of the Western tradition of political thought.  As a means of moving from the familiar to the unfamiliar, the thinkers and themes discussed in the course will be introduced through the lens of Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are. This simple story contains within it a number of questions that are closely related to the central questions of political thought. How did Max become king?  Was he a just king?  Was he a good king? What does it mean that the story all takes place in a dream?   Authors to be discussed include Plato, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Locke, Marx and Nietzsche.


POLI 260 (3)        INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS    

Section 001  1st Term  T-R  14:00 – 15:30

Instructor: Arjun Chowdhury
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of Global Politics (or International Relations).  Accordingly, the course will examine international relations theory, decision-making analysis, international security and conflict management, the evolution and future of the international economy, development, the role of institutions and non-state actors, globalization, and the politics of climate change.  The course material is oriented toward issues of contemporary and future relevance, and students will be expected to incorporate current issues into their work.


POLI 260 (3)        INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS  

Section 002  1st Term  M-W-F  13:00 – 14:00

Instructor: Robert Farkasch
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the basic principles of global politics. It is not a course about current events per se though an effort will be made to integrate contemporary events and issues as a way of understanding the world beyond our borders. The lectures and readings will be used to illustrate basic principles that are both historical and contemporary.


POLI 260 (3)         INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS

Section 003  2nd Term  M-W-F   14:00 – 15:00

Instructor: Richard Price
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

Many observers seem to have a sense that global politics is in a state of great flux, with global financial crises, the spread of epidemic disease, global climate change, the geopolitics of cyberspace, and new outbreaks of violence whether it be war in the Ukraine or ISIS in the Middle East. This course will examine some of these and other key global political events, situating in them in the context of continuities and change from the past, to investigate what patterns of contemporary global politics might represent fundamental transformations (for which new approaches and new thinking may be required), and what – if anything – resembles the past (lessons from which we can apply today). Students will be introduced to a variety of concepts and theories to use as tools of analysis for world politics. The aim of cultivating such analytical skills of diagnosing the world’s challenges and opportunities is to enable students to think in an informed and critical way about how to address some of the big challenges of our time.


POLI 303  (3)         FEDERALISM IN CANADA

Section 002  1st Term  M-W-F  10:00 – 11:00

Instructor: Allan Craigie
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

Federalism is a form of organizing decision making which constitutionally divides state power between a central government and regional governments.  Canada is one of only a handful of federal states in the world today.  The Canadian state is a continent-spanning multinational federation whose true nature is a source of great political debate.  Building upon students’ knowledge of Canadian politics and the Canadian state, Federalism in Canada will examine the structures, histories and processes of Canadian federalism within a broad theoretical context to gain in-depth understanding of the continually evolving Canadian federal system. The course culminates in a day-long simulated First Ministers’ Conference.


POLI 306-001 (3)               LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN CANADA

Section 001  1st Term  M-W-F  9:00 – 10:00

Instructor:  Paul Kopas
Required Text: Reading Package
Prerequisite:  POLI 101

This course will examine the structure of governing institutions and political processes at the municipal level concentrating on Vancouver and other British Columbia communities, but with reference to experience elsewhere in Canada.  It will also explore the relationship with provincial and federal governments and assess the influence of senior governments at the local level.  Attention will be given to critiques of local government from political, economy, feminist, indigenous and multicultural perspectives.


POLI 308A (3)                     ISSUES IN CANADIAN POLITICS

Section 002  2nd Term  M-W  13:00 – 14:00

Instructor: Andrew Owen
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course examines the nature of public opinion in contemporary Canada. The primary focus of this course concerns theoretical claims about factors that influence public opinion and the empirical evidence that supports these claims. We will also discuss how best to conceptualize and measure public opinion and the effects that public opinion has on public policies. By the end of the course students will be able to identify and understand the factors that shape public opinion in Canada and other mature democracies. This course will also help students become more discerning consumers of public opinion data by providing them with the tools needed to critically evaluate claims about public opinion commonly found in media coverage and popular discussions of politics. Much of the reading material for this course involves quantitative analysis of public opinion survey data. Accordingly, students are strongly encouraged to take POLI 380 prior to, or concurrently with, this course.


POLI 309 (3)                        CANADIAN PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN RIGHTS

Section 001   2nd Term  T-R  11:00 – 12:30

Instructor: Samuel LaSelva
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course examines key issues in the history, theory and practice of human rights in Canada. The methodological orientation of the course is critical, analytical and philosophical. The main themes of the course include: (A) The Philosophical, Comparative and International Background to Human Rights, (B) Human Rights and the Human Good in the Old and New Canada, (C) Charter Rights and Charter Problems. When appropriate, historical and contemporary Canadian issues are considered in terms of their wider international and comparative contexts.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS: class test; major research essay; final exam

COURSE TEXTS:  TBA.   Please Note: the above information is intended to provide some general guidelines about the course and is subject to revision.


POLI 316A (3)                     GLOBAL INDIGENOUS POLITICS

Section 001   1st Term   T-R  12:30 – 14:00

Instructor: Sheryl Lightfoot
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

With the onslaught of European colonialism beginning in the 1400s, Indigenous peoples around the world were subjected to various forms of colonial rule.  This course examines this history of colonialism and considers some of the various responses Indigenous peoples have invoked, both on the national and international levels.  Its purpose is to situate Indigenous peoples’ political struggles in global politics.  The first part of the course will examine Indigenous peoples’ experience with colonialism in both historical and theoretical perspective.  The second part of the course will explore colonialism’s direct and indirect effects on Indigenous peoples and their reactions to it, through the use of regional case studies.  In the third part of the course, the international Indigenous peoples’ movement, operating both within and outside the United Nations system, will be analyzed.  The course culminates in a simulated United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues where students will serve as representatives of either Indigenous NGOs or state governments.


POLI 320A (3)    Government and Politics of the United States of America

Section 002  2nd Term  T R  9:30 – 11:00

Instructor: Gyung-Ho Jeong
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course is an introduction to US Politics. We will examine how various agents and institutions inside and outside of government interact with each other. The topics include: the constitution, federalism, civil rights, political institutions (the President, Congress, and the Supreme Court), public opinion, and elections and voting behavior.


POLI 320B (3)
Government and Politics of the United States of America

Section 001  1st Term  T R  9:30 – 11:00

Instructor: Paul Quirk
Required Text: TBA
Essays and Exams:
-Midterm
-Research project
-Final exam
Prerequisites: none

Why was the US the last developed nation in the world to establish nearly universal health care?  Why does it now face a burden of public debt that threatens the country with long-term decline in prosperity and influence?  On the other hand, why was the U.S. the wealthiest, most powerful, and often most admired country in the world for most of the past century?  And why has it done more than Canada (yes, more!) to address the problem of climate change?

This course analyzes the nature and performance of the policymaking process in US national government.  Topics include:  the role and effects of institutions (especially Congress, the presidency, and the bureaucracy); the influence of interest groups and public opinion; the political causes of economic inequality; and the nature and influence of policy analysis and expert advice.  Policy areas include economic policy, health, environment, “social” issues, and foreign policy.   Leading questions:  Can US government make responsive and intelligent decisions?  What explains the distinctive tendencies of US policies on health, crime, and gay rights?   A major, question throughout is whether the increasingly severe ideological conflict between the Democratic and Republican parties is making US government incapable of solving problems, and leading to national decline.


POLI 321A (3)                     Chinese Politics and Development

Section 001  1st Term  T R  15:30 – 17:00
Section 002  2nd Term  T R 12:30 – 14:00

Instructor: Xiaojun Li
Required Texts:  Governing China : From Revolution Through Reform 2/E: LIEBERTHAL
Prerequisites: 3rd year

This course presents an introductory overview of China’s political and economic development from 1949 to the present as well as the challenges that the leadership and average citizens face in China today. Among the topics covered are China’s political institutions, the economy, legal system, corruption, environmental protection, and media and internet control. No knowledge of Chinese is required.


POLI 324A (3) SOUTHEAST ASIAN GOVERNMENTS AND POLITICS

Instructor: Kai Ostwald
Required Texts:
  Milton Osborne (2010) – Southeast Asia: An Introductory History
Essays and Exams:
·         map quiz
·         in class midterm
·         short paper (5 pages)
·         final examination

Southeast Asia is one of the world’s most dynamic regions and is nearly unmatched in terms of ethnic, religious, and historical diversity. It is a region that has experienced exceptional growth, but that is also marked by lingering inequalities and areas of grinding poverty. Aside from being a fascinating region for its colorful cultures, coups, and captivating personalities, its experiences offer countless lessons for students of political, social, and economic development.

This course provides a systematic introduction to the countries of both mainland and maritime Southeast Asia. It begins with an overview of the region’s complex history, before examining countries through agency-based, structural, and institutional frameworks. The course touches on a variety of themes including political legitimacy, economic development, national identity, ethnic and other social cleavages, human rights, political Islam, as well as domestic and international security.


POLI 327 (3) EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

Section 001   1st Term  M-W  8:30 – 10:00

Instructor: Kurt Hübner
Texts:  TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

Lately, the project of European Integration was running into rather severe problems. For many observers, the problems very much have to do with the crises of some member states of the Eurozone; others are pointing to the size of the project that generated substantial governance problems. Furthermore, new geopolitical conflicts along the eastern border of the European Union give rise for concerns. This course provides a historical-institutional view on the process of European Integration after WW II by looking at the rise of the EU as well as the role of particular European nation-states in the formation of an EU-wide economic, political and cultural space. The course will introduce a variety of analytical-theoretical concepts that explain in various manners the working of the EU. Given the strong economic features of European Integration some basic understanding of economic concepts is helpful.

Students of this course simultaneously can pre-qualify for an additional summer course that brings up to 10 students for three weeks to Europe in order to study the core institutions of the EU.

 

POLI 328B (3)           TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Section 001  2nd Term T R  12:30 – 14:00

Instructor: Cesi Cruz
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see website

This course focuses on the interplay between political institutions and economic growth. We will examine how governments shape economic policies and the emergence and expansion of markets, with special attention to the politics of development aid. The first part of the course explores the economic importance of markets and institutions from a comparative perspective. The second part of the course extends these theories to the practice of development aid and includes modules on: i) strategic considerations in the decision to allocate or withhold aid; ii) political determinants of aid effectiveness; and iii) intended and unintended political consequences of development aid.


POLI 332 (3)             POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT OF LATIN AMERICA

Section 001  1st Term  T R  12:30 – 14:00

Instructor: Maxwell Cameron

Required Texts:  Isbester, Katherine. The Paradox of Democracy in Latin America: Ten Country Studies of Division and Resilience. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011
Prerequisites: see internet

Why have some Latin American countries developed orderly legal and political institutions and democratic regimes based on well-established citizenship rights, while poor quality democracies (and hybrid regimes) with low-intensity citizenship persist in the more politicized states of the region? This course examines the stylized facts of Latin American political development—shared patterns of anarchy, oligarchic states, import-substituting industrialization, incorporation via corporatism or populist mobilization, repression, re-democratization and market reform, and shifts to the left—in order to compare distinctive trajectories of institutional development. The precariousness of contemporary democratic regimes will be traced to high levels of inequality and poverty, exclusion of indigenous peoples, labour-repressive agriculture, reliance on extractive industries, weak representative institutions, centralization of power in the executive branch of government, authoritarian enclaves and de facto powers, and, in some areas, pervasive and systemic violence and repression. A major goal of this course is to survey the quality and diversity of democratic institutions in the region and provide students with a detailed look at some of the most important issues the region faces, as well as their historical origins. Some of the most important concepts and theories in the field of comparative politics, including bureaucratic authoritarianism, clientelism, incorporation, corporatism, populism, transitions to democracy, delegative democracy, vertical and horizontal accountability, and competitive authoritarianism, have originated or been refined in studies of Latin America. Countries covered include Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Argentina, Brazil and Chile.


POLI 333A (3)         ISSUES IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Section 001  2nd Term  T R  12:30 – 14:00

Instructor: Gyung-Ho Jeong
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course introduces students to the structure and practice of the federal government of the USA. In particular, this course aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the presidency and Congress. This is a demanding course, with a substantial amount of reading. It is imperative that you read all assigned readings before the class for which they are assigned.


POLI 341A (3)            COMPARATIVE POLITICAL THEORY

Section 001  2nd Term T R  15:30 – 17:00

Instructor: TBA
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

TBA


POLI 344A (3)          SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT

Section 001  2nd Term  T R  17:30 – 19:00

Instructor: Jennifer Gagnon
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course takes to heart Socrates’ maxim “know thyself” and strives to study ancient Greek political thought as a way of gaining distance and critical perspective on the ancient world, our own time, and ourselves. Despite obvious differences in society, culture, and technology, the ancient Greeks faced many questions and dilemmas similar to our own. What makes us human? Are democracy and empire compatible? Is free speech a threat to democracy? What does it mean to be a good citizen? When, if ever, is war justified? What forms of violence are glorified or condemned? Throughout the course we will be attentive to the context and history of ancient Greece while always casting an eye towards the present and the question of “what is to be done?” Among the themes that this course will explore are: the transition from Greek city-states, (poleis), to Empire, the claims the state may make on the individual, the relationship of the theatre to politics, and concepts of the self, gender, and violence. We will grapple with these themes through the works of the Greek poets and tragedians, (Homer, Pindar, Sophocles, and Euripides) and the writings of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and others.


POLI 345 (3)             GENDER AND POLITICS: POLITICAL THOUGHT AND PRACTICE

Section 001 1st Term  W  16:00 – 19:00

Instructor: Jennifer Gagnon
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

Why study feminism and gender today? Didn’t the feminist movement achieve all its goals? Isn’t feminism over? Haven’t LGBTQIA+ peoples achieved equality? This course examines not only the past goals and accomplishments of feminist, gender, and queer politics, but also the present and future struggles for these movements. Students will be introduced to the historical and theoretical foundations of feminist theory, gender theory, and queer theory. We will closely examine the interconnectedness of concepts of male, female, gender, race, sex, and power in forms of discrimination and oppression through feminist, gender, and queer critiques of inequality, family, work, health, sexuality, identity, and politics. Because feminist thought, gender politics, and queer theory are not monolithic, we will explore the many different and often conflicting ways that activists and theorists address issues of gender, sexism, inequality, and oppression. Beyond the assumption that gender inequality and sexism are unjust, this course takes no single political perspective. Instead, this course strives to arm students with the critical and analytical skills needed to start seeing, thinking about, and ultimately changing gender inequality and oppression in our world.


POLI 347A     LAW AND POLITICAL THEORY                    

Section 001  1st Term       T R  11:00 – 12:30

Instructor: Samuel LaSelva
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course examines key theories and issues in jurisprudence and political philosophy. Its main concepts and themes include: sovereignty, adjudication, equality rights, free speech and pornography, rights in time of emergency, as well as various critical approaches to law such as legal positivism, American legal realism and Critical Legal Studies.  The orientation of the course is analytical, critical, and dialectical. Students who register in Political Science 347 should have either a background in or an aptitude for political theory and a taste for rigorous (but polite) philosophical argument.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS: class test; major research essay; final exam

COURSE TEXTS:  TBA.    Please Note: the above information is intended to provide some general guidelines about the course and is subject to revision.


POLI 360 (3)     SECURITY STUDY

Section:  001       2nd Term M W  10:00 – 11:00

Instructor: Brian Job
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: POLI 260

This course is designated as Writing Intensive

This course considers “internal conflict,” (intrastate conflict, regional conflict, civil war, ethnic conflict.) We will explore dimensions of internal conflicts: the issues at stake, the role and strategies of leaders and followers, the motivations of people who engage in violence and in the commitment of atrocities (including sexual violence), and the dilemmas confronting humanitarians and post-conflict peace builders. After examining broad conflict trends and causes of conflicts and violence, attention will be focused on four case studies. Each will be investigated to expose a different aspect of today’s civil conflicts: Bosnia (ethnic cleansing, genocide, gender-based violence), South Sudan (secession, armed groups, natural resources, gender-based violence), and Haiti (non-state armed groups, urban violence, dilemmas of providing aid), and the Boko Haram (non-state armed groups, strategies of terror and atrocities, followers-leaders.)

This is a “writing-intensive” designated course. As such, students will engage in different modes of writing about conflict (opinion pieces, conceptual framing pieces, and policy memoranda). Emphasis will be placed upon honing students’ analytical skills. Weekly tutorial session will be devoted to focused debate and to providing assistance with assignments.  There will be four short written assignments and a final exam.  All necessary readings will be provided through a course website.


POLI 360A (3)         SECURITY STUDY

Section 002  2nd Term  T R  14:00 – 15:30

Instructor: Arjun Chowdhury
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

Why do people – whether in state armies, rebel groups, or armed gangs – fight each other? We will analyze three types of conflict: interstate wars, intrastate wars, and terrorism. In each case, we will evaluate the causes (why wars happen), the process of wars (how they are fought, how they end), and policy options for dealing with war (how to stop war, or fight them better).


POLI 363A (3)     CANADIAN FOREIGN POLICY

Section 002  2nd Term  T R  12:30 – 14:00
Section 001 2nd Term    M W F  13:00 – 14:00

Instructor: Allan Craigie
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course is an analysis of Canadian foreign policy both on important international issues influencing Canada since the 1960s and of the foreign policy making process in Canada. Issues may include defense commitments, economic relations, activities of international organizations, and relations with the US, Europe, USSR, Asia and the Third World. It uses the study of Canadian Foreign Policy to bring greater insight into the nature of both the Canadian state and Canadian democracy.


POLI 364A  (3)           INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Section 001  1st Term T R  14:00 – 15:30

Instructor: Katherina Coleman
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

This course examines the role of formal international organizations in world politics. Its purpose is to introduce several contemporary international organizations and to analyse whether and how they shape international events. The first part of the course examines how various theoretical approaches to international relations understand the role of international organizations. The second part is more empirical and focuses on several major contemporary intergovernmental organizations, including the United Nations and NATO.


POLI 366 (3)              INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

Section 001  1st Term M W F  9:00 – 10:00
Section 002  2nd Term      M W F 13:00 – 14:00

Instructor: Robert Farkasch
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: none

This course provides an integrated approach to understanding some of the basic themes of the international political economy (IPE). A multi-disciplinary perspective encompassing insights from the modern disciplines of history, sociology, politics and economics will be called upon to better understand and explain the process of globalization. The tension between market pressures to disperse or concentrate various forms of economic activity and state efforts to enhance or resist those pressures is a theme that will run throughout. Whether markets are embedded within or autonomous from political institutions depends on the theoretical perspective employed. An introduction to the economic liberal, realist, and Marxist/alternative perspectives will provide an overview of the underlying issues and competing ideologies that shape the global political economy. The course will then consider issues conventionally associated with the study of IPE including the political economy of international trade, the role of multinational corporations, international finance, and international development. The course then shifts to topics not normally associated with the study of IPE even though their impact is crucial for understanding causality. The impact from migrations and culture on the processes shaping the contemporary global political economy calls for a wider approach to the study of IPE.


POLI 367B (3)    
International Relations Theory and the International System

Section 001   1st Term  T R  14:00 – 15:30

Instructor: Robert Crawford
Required Texts:  TBA
Essays and Exams:  TBA
Prerequisite: Poli 260 is recommended but not required

This course examines the origins, development, and current status of theoretical inquiry in world politics. It examines past and unfolding debates over the defining features, core problems, and appropriate theoretical methods and aspirations for International Relations (IR), and critically evaluates the various “schools” of IR identified by its practitioners. The course also traces the pre-disciplinary roots of what is today called “IR theory” in the broader traditions of ancient and modern political philosophy and related fields, offering detailed analysis of the formative era of IR as a self-standing academic discipline in the years following the First World War. While the course is organized around analysis of distinct theories it also seeks to alert students to conflicting views about the nature and limits of knowledge, underlying assumptions about what constitutes the “reality” of world politics, and the intricate ways in which the normative, legal, and practical aspects of international relations are fused. The course does not merely rehearse the major debates that have come to define international relations discourse, but reveals deeper disputes that seem to threaten the very existence of a united, coherent IR discipline. Ultimately, the course makes a case for international relations as an inter discipline that has come to profit from embracing and amalgamating insights from a number of overlapping fields.


POLI 369A (3)                     Issues in International Security    

Section 001   2nd Term T R  14:00 – 15:30

Instructor: Robert Crawford
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: none

This course examines the evolving relationship between Multinational Corporations (MNCs), other nonstate actors, and states in the modern era, evaluating the perceived benefits and costs of foreign direct investment in a number of selected countries, regions, and industries. Our primary objectives are to assess the impact of MNCs on the politics, economies, and societies of states, and to evaluate the effectiveness or desirability of various attempts to control, limit, and regulate MNC behaviour. The course traces the political evolution of the MNC from an actor once seen merely as a source of, or threat to, state power, to its emerging status—among the very largest MNCs at least—as agent and participant in global governance. Given the vast number of MNCs, stakeholders, and issues available, special attention is paid to countries, industries, actors, and practices where the potential for political impact and conflict is greatest.


POLI 369B(3):    International Politics of the Arctic (Fall 2016)

Section 001  1st Term  M W           14:00 – 15:30

Instructor: Michael Byers
Required texts:  TBA
Prerequisites: see internet

For decades, the Arctic was on the front-lines of the Cold War. Today, the region is changing at an unprecedented rate due to climate change, the extraction of natural resources, and the efforts of coastal states to secure offshore jurisdictional claims. This upper-year undergraduate course canvasses a range of political and legal issues, from the disputes over Hans Island and the boundary in the Beaufort Sea, to shipping in the Northwest Passage and the Northern Sea Route, to the assertion of sovereign rights over areas of seabed more than 200 nautical miles from shore, to the protection of high seas fisheries in the Central Arctic Ocean. The environmental, security and geopolitical dimensions of a rapidly opening Arctic will also be considered, along with the role of indigenous peoples and the Arctic Council.

Lectures & Office Hours:

Lectures are on Mondays and Wednesday from 2:00-3:10 PM, beginning on September 7, 2016.

Professor Byers’ office hours are on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00-1:40 PM in Buchanan C417, or by appointment.

Evaluation:

  • Optional 4000 to 5000-word mid-term research essay: 50% of final grade. Due November 28 by 2 PM in class and on TurnItIn. Students wishing written comments, in addition to their grade, must submit their essay by November 21.
  • 120-minute final exam: 100% of final grade; 50% of final grade for students opting to write the term paper.


POLI 369D (3)    
ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Section 001  2nd Term  M W F  12:00 – 13:00

Instructor: Robert Farkasch
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: POLI 260 strongly recommended

This course will analyze various aspects of terrorism in both the international and domestic communities including the structure and dynamics of terrorism, terrorist weapons, strategies and tactics, their use of the media, and theories of counterterrorism are all covered. The course will also explore Jihadism/Islamism, a political movement dating from the early-20th century Middle East given the extensive coverage in today’s contemporary media. With its radical interpretations of the Koran, the Muslim holy text, Islamism calls upon its supporters to engage in acts of violence against those in the West and elsewhere who are said to suppress and humiliate Muslims and seek the annihilation of Islam and Islamic civilization. We will seek to explain why Islamists commit acts of violence, draw parallels between Islamism and other forms of terror in the West. The course also asks about the meaning and practice of “state terror”.


POLI 370A  (3)    Issues in International Conflict Management

Section 001  1st Term  T R  12:30 –  14:00

Instructor:  Jenny Peterson
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite:

Peacebuilding and Post Conflict Reconstruction

Following the military phase of both international and civil wars, conflict affected countries are often ‘treated’ with a wide range of reforms and programs which fall under the umbrella of ‘peacebuilding’ or ‘post conflict reconstruction’.  This course will critically explore the discourses and policies related to these terms, addressing the ideological, analytical and operational dimensions of efforts to transform conflict affected societies.   Topics will include conflict negotiation, rule of law programming, DDR programs and ethnic reconciliation.  A range of case studies will be used to explore the above themes, programs and analytical approaches.


POLI 373 (3)                        ETHICS IN WORLD POLITICS

Section 001  2nd Term  M W F  15:00 – 16:00

Instructor: Chris Erickson
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

It is commonplace to speak about the traditions of International Relations theory as pragmatic guides to statecraft.  It is not difficult to see how the assumptions of realism, for example, are intended to guide the behavior of those in power.  They can also be considered from an ethical perspective. This course will examine the ethical dimensions of the traditions of IR theory.   We will look into the ethical implications of some of the central theoretical traditions of IR, including realism, idealism, Marxism, and various critical, constructivist or post-structural approaches.


POLI 373 (3)                        ETHICS IN WORLD POLITICS

Section 002  1st Term  M W   9:00 – 10:00

Instructor: Richard Price
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite:  see website

Can the world really be made a morally better place? What could you or other actors do about it and how? Students will examine global advocacy campaigns to understand why some efforts at transnational moral change succeed while others fail.

Claiming that a global advocacy campaign is a success implies we agree it is a morally good thing – but many global challenges resist solution because they involve conflicting moral imperatives. Should interventions have been undertaken in Libya or Kosovo? The second part of the course will engage you with different traditions of moral thought in order to provide you with the tools to make judgments about important moral dilemmas. Issues will then be examined in the third part of the course, such as: Who should be allowed to immigrate and where? Is torture ever justifiable, and what constitutes torture? Who should pay for global climate change mitigation?


POLI 374A (3)      
International Peacekeeping

Section 001   1st Term  M W F  15:00 – 16:00

Instructor: Allen Sens
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite:  see website

This course will introduce students to the theory, evolution, and practice of International Peacekeeping. The course will explore the development of peacekeeping within and outside the United Nations system, and how peacekeeping has evolved as an instrument of conflict management. The diplomatic, organizational, and operational elements of peacekeeping will be examined in detail, with a view to evaluating lessons learned, reform efforts, and the challenges facing current and future operations. Students will be expected to apply this knowledge to current conflicts and peacekeeping operations, as well as future contingencies. Case studies will be used to illustrate course themes.


POLI 375A (3)     GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS

Section 001  1st Term  M W  F  14:00 – 15:00
Section 002  2nd Term M W F   15:00 – 16:00

Instructor: Peter Dauvergne
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

This course analyzes the politics of global sustainability and justice, striving for critical thought that integrates both rigorous analysis and ethical reflection. The focus is on the consequences of political discourses, institutions, and power struggles for global ecological change, taking an interdisciplinary approach that does not assume a background in international relations. How, in what ways, and to what extent is global environmental politics making a difference for advancing global sustainability and justice? How and why is the changing over time? What does this suggest for the future? To answer these questions, the course analyzes topics such as the causes and consequences of unsustainable development, the ecological shadows of consumption, the power of environmentalism as a social movement, the social justice consequences of climate change, the contradictions of technology, the effectiveness of international agreements, the rising importance of city-level governance, the eco-business of multinational corporations, and the value of certification and eco-consumerism. The course concludes by assessing the merits of various pathways toward environmental sustainability and social justice.


POLI 377 (3)                       
Nuclear Weapons and Arms Control

Section 001  1st Term  T R  12:30 – 14:00

Instructor: Allen Sens
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

This team-taught, flexible/blended learning interdisciplinary course will introduce students to the history, politics, and scientific principles and practices of nuclear weapons and nuclear arms control. Nuclear weapons, and nuclear weapons arms control and verification, are subjects that cannot be fully understood or addressed solely through the disciplinary knowledge and methods of the physical and life sciences or the social sciences and humanities. Instead, an interdisciplinary approach is required, which integrates and synthesizes the contributions of the many disciplines engaged in the study of nuclear weapons and arms control efforts. In this course, a special emphasis will be placed on the political issues and debates and the scientific methodologies and verification practices associated with the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO).


POLI 380  (3)                      
Quantitative Methods in Political Science

Section 001   1st Term  M W F  11:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Charles Breton
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

An introduction to quantitative methods as utilized in the study of Political Science.


POLI 380 (3)                       
Quantitative Methods in Political Science

Section 002   2nd Term  M W F  11:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Andrew Owen
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

An introduction to quantitative methods as utilized in the study of Political Science.

Note:  This course is required for students in the Political Science Majors or Honours program. It is not available for credit to those who have already taken an introductory statistics course.


POLI 390 (3)                        Honours Seminar

Section 001  2nd Term  R  14:00 – 17:00

Instructor: Charles Breton
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

TBA


POLI 402A  (3)    Law and Politics of the Canadian Constitution

Section 001  2nd Term  R  14:00 – 17:00

Instructor: Samuel LaSelva
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

The course examines key problems of the Canadian constitution, with special emphasis on federalism and the Charter of Rights. Its purpose is to encourage philosophical discussion of Canadian constitutional problems, while placing them in historical and comparative perspective. Topics include: the Canadian, British, and American constitutional models; theories of judicial review before and after the Charter; the notwithstanding clause and reasonable limits on rights; free expression and hate literature; multiculturalism and aboriginal rights; equality rights;  emergency powers;  and  foundational questions about secession, federalism, and  political unity under the condition of cultural pluralism.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: two oral presentations with two short essays; a participation mark; a major research essay

Course Texts: TBA.       Please Note: the above information is intended to provide some general guidelines about the course and is subject to revision.


POLI  405A/504A (3)                        TOPICS IN CANADIAN POLITICS                

Section 001  1st Term  W   14:00 – 17:00

Instructor: Allan Tupper
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

This course examines the profound changes in the structure, role and processes of public management in modern countries.

Among the topics examined are the power of civil servants, the status of the Weberian welfare state and public management reform.

These themes are examined through comparative analysis of such topics as accountability, government ethics (including dirty hands and many hands problems), alternative service delivery (the delivery of government services by NGOs and/or private firms) and public private partnerships. Other important topics include E government and debates about the balance between secrecy, data collection for security purposes, and privacy protection.

The course focuses on advanced democracies notably EU countries, Canada, the US and Australia. Canadian examples are derived from federal, provincial, municipal and Aboriginal governments.

POLI 405/504 is run as seminar. Student obligations include presentations, short papers and a major research essay.


POLI 420B/514B  (3)   Comparative Western Governments: Core Seminar in United States Politics

Section 001  1st Term  R  14:30 – 17:30

Instructor: Paul Quirk
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite:

This seminar offers a broad introduction to US politics and to the exceptionally rich political science literature in this area.  A major objective is to promote work on US-related topics among students in comparative politics, international politics, or political theory.

The course surveys a wide range of areas:  the Constitution, political development, Congress, the Presidency, courts, bureaucracy, political parties, interest groups, the media, elections and voting, public opinion, public policy (including foreign policy), and the US in comparative perspective. Readings will combine notable recent studies and earlier works that remain influential; a number of readings will make direct comparisons with Canadian politics.

Some major themes of discussion include: rational-choice, psychological, historical and other approaches; deliberative processes and the use of information in policymaking; the influence of interest groups and public opinion; and comparisons with parliamentary systems, especially Canada’s.  Students may write their longer essay (see below) either on a strictly US-focused topic or on a US-related topic in comparative politics, international politics, or political theory.


POLI 420C/516B  (3)    
Advanced Topics in Comparative Politics

Section 001  1st Term  T  9:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Gyung-Ho Jeong
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite:

This is a course on the politics of US foreign policy. We will examine domestic sources of the U.S. foreign policymaking: the main players (President, Congress, bureaucrats, political parties, interest groups, and the public) and policymaking processes. This course is not a course on international relations. We will not study specific US foreign policies, such as US nuclear policy or US policy toward the Middle East or any region. Two exceptions are trade policy and humanitarian interventions. There are two main objectives of this course.

This course is reading and writing heavy. You will read three journal articles per week and write discussion memos every other week, in addition to a research paper and review reports. Most of all, class participation is very important for the success. If you just come to class regularly and rarely speak in class, you cannot pass the course.


POLI 422A/551A       Selected Problems in Comparative Politics

Section 001  2nd Term  T  11:00 – 14:00

Instructor: Richard Johnston
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

This seminar course surveys the literatures on parties, electoral systems, party systems, and structural aspects of voting. The course is comparative, but makes special reference to Canada and the US.
Topics include:
• Parties and party systems, the concepts.
• Origins and impact of electoral systems, and their interaction with other political institutions.
• Origins, dimensional underpinnings, and transformation of party systems in consolidated democracies.
• Emergent party systems in post-authoritarian regimes.


POLI 440B (3)   
Contemporary Political Theory

Section 001  1st Term R  14:00 – 17:00

Instructor: Samuel LaSelva
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

This course examines some of the most important modern and contemporary political thinkers and their contributions to the theme of “human rights in theory and practice.” It considers the historical origins and philosophical significance of human/natural rights as well as the challenges posed by their critics and by their implementation in a culturally heterogeneous world. Topics include: the moral, legal and philosophical foundations of contemporary human rights; Burke, Bentham and Marx as critics of natural rights; Rawls, Dworkin, Hart and Waldron on the role of rights in liberal constitutional theory;  arguments for and against of socio-economic rights such as the right to welfare;  Sandel and Pateman on the communitarian and radical feminist critique of rights;  religious persecution and religious toleration as issues of human rights; and the fate of human rights in an increasingly violent world. The methodological orientation of the course is normative and analytical. In the seminars, the conversation is dialectical and critical (including self-criticism).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: two oral presentations with two short essays; a participation mark; a major research essay

Course Texts: TBA.   Please Note: the above information is intended to provide some general guidelines about the course and is subject to revision.


POLI 448A (3)     CONTEMPORARY DEMOCRATIC THEORY

Section 001   2nd Term  M  14:00 – 17:00

Instructor: Mark Warren
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite:  see website

Since the fall of the Berlin Wall the idea of democracy has become the dominant frame for thinking about political systems. Democratic theory has developed apace, and is now a diverse, expansive, exciting, and rapidly developing field of inquiry. This seminar introduces the field of democratic theory, and provides opportunities to combine normatively significant problems in democratic theory with empirical research. The first part of the seminar surveys traditional and received problems in democratic theory. The second part focuses on several contemporary approaches to democratic theory, with an emphasis of achieving democratic ideals in large scale, complex, pluralistic societies. The final part is devoted the research and theorizing of seminar participants. Topics will include deliberative democracy, democracy and justice, multiculturalism, as well as new theories of representation and political legitimacy. Readings are mostly drawn from complete original texts, and are likely to include works by Dahl, Tilly, Habermas, Pzerworski, Young, Benhabib, Rosanvallon, and Pettit. The seminar is reading and writing intensive, and assessment is based on seminar presentations, critical reviews, and a final research paper.


POLI 449A  (3)      TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY

Section 002  2nd Term  F  9:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Chris Erickson
Required Texts: TBA
Essays and Exams: TBA
Prerequisite: see website

Spectres and War Machines: Politics as Major Science

We are living in a time when our models seem not to be keeping pace with our realities.  Some have called this a “postmodern” era.  The critiques that have been put forward by a number of “postmodern” thinkers are reasonably well known, but what happens after the critique ends?  I God and the author alike are “dead”, how do we best live our lives?  What might the reconstructive process implied in the very idea of deconstruction look like?  This course will address the question of how a “postmodern” critique might inform how politics is done.  Participants in the seminar will be asked to probe the question(s) of what the practical implications of postmodern theory might be.  There will be a primary focus on Derrida’s Spectres of Marx and Deleuze and Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus, although outside reading is strongly encouraged.


POLI 460A      
FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS

Section 001   1st Term  R  10:00 – 13:00

Instructor: Allan Craigie
Required Texts:
TBA
Prerequisites: POLI 101 required, POLI 363A recommended

This course explores how Canada, a global middle power, uses its comparatively limited military resources as an instrument of domestic and foreign policy. The role of the military in modern societies will be addressed, before moving on to the complexities of the Canadian Forces. Canadian contributions to international military and humanitarian interventions such as Afghanistan, Haiti, East Timor, the First and Second Iraq Wars, Libya, and the Former Yugoslav Republics will be discussed. Domestic and counter-terror operations will also be explored to better understand civil-military relations in Canada. As well, the relationship between military procurement and regional and industrial development in Canada will be examined focusing on recent topics such as the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy and the debates surrounding the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

The course will be comprised of student led discussions, debates, and presentations; as such it is vital that students come prepared to each and every class. Accordingly, a sizable portion of student evaluation will be based on class participation and student presentations.

Students who enroll in the class should be aware that guest speakers and class excursions may be arranged. A small fee may be required to support these activities and attendance will be mandatory.


POLI 461  (3)      PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES

Section 001  2nd Term  W  9:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Jenny Peterson
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: see internet


POLI 461     Critical Peace Studies

Through an exploration of both orthodox and critical approaches to peace, this course will provide students with a range of conceptual tools that can be used to analyze both the nature of peace itself and the various policy interventions aimed at creating it. Students will begin by exploring the supposed differences between ‘problem solving’ vs ‘critical approaches’.  Following this, a range of ideas from the sub-field of critical peace studies will be explored, including critiques of liberalism, non-violent resistance, hybridity, ‘the everyday’, radical disagreement, agonistic politics, the narrative turn in IR and indigenous perspectives.  Students will apply these ideas to a range of case studies (both local and global) with the aim of exploring the relevance of critical perspectives in analyzing different modes of peacebuilding.  Students will also have the opportunity to explore and debate the utility of critical approaches in improving/creating peacebuilding policies.


POLI 462 (3)        INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY

Section 001  1st Term  W  9:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Michael Byers
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: None. Some knowledge of IR theory and Sci-Fi movies is desirable.

Space is the final frontier for humanity and therefore international relations. Space sees considerable cooperation, including between the US and Russia on the International Space Station. Yet Space is also increasingly militarized, through the heavy use of imaging and communications satellites and the related development of anti-satellite weapons. Space is an important part of the global economy, involving 100s of billions of dollars of activity annually. Now, rapid technological developments such as reusable rockets are opening the door to Space mining and the eventual colonization of other planets. All these developments create challenges for national and international policy makers. They also cast new light onto the discipline of international relations and its traditional problems and theories.

Evaluation:

Three factors are considered for evaluation purposes:

1.       Individual effort, initiative, ingenuity, and teamwork—as expressed through the provision of collegial support and constructive criticism for the work of other students (33 percent);

2.       An oral presentation to a public workshop (33 percent);

3.       A term paper of between 4000-5000 words on a specific issue or insight relating to the course focus (33 percent).


POLI 464A (3)                        PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: CHILDREN AND GLOBAL CONFLICT

Section 002    2nd Term W 10:00 – 13:00

Instructor: Donna Seto
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites: none

Children neither start wars nor are they directly responsible for them, yet in nearly every corner of the world children and youth are affected by conflict. Recent figures provided by the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) suggests that over 1 billion children live in countries affected by armed conflict, where some 300 million are under the age of five. Children living in conflict zones suffer from indirect harms that can leave them homeless, orphaned or stateless. Children also suffer from direct detriments in war such as being maimed, permanently disabled, raped or used as sex slaves, recruited for labour, detained, and/or participate as combatants. The aim of this course is to explore how children are affected by the dynamics of global conflict. This course will explore cases such as child soldiers, youth suicide bombers, children born of wartime sexual violence, unaccompanied child refugees, children in detention, and children as peacemakers. In addition, it explores trauma experienced by war-affected children and questions how they exhibit agency and resilience. Lastly, this course will consider the responsibility of the international community in protecting children as well as as how war-affected children are represented in popular culture. In doing so, the course will explore questions such as: What is childhood? Why have children been missing from the study of international security? How does including the experiences of children change the study of war and peace?


POLI 464B (3)                     PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Section 002   2nd Term   W  14:00 – 17:00

Instructor: Yves Tiberghien
Required Texts:

1.       Rodrik, Dani. 2011. The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the Future of the World Economy. Norton. And two more books.

2.       READING PACKAGE, available from the instructor. This package is a valuable collection of key articles and book chapters taken from the best books on Globalization. It is something to keep for the long-term as a great reference.

3.       WEEKLY SUMMARY PAPERS (two of them, 4-5 pages each) written by fellow students

4.       EMAILS AND WEB LINKS, as sent by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Enrolment is restricted to third and fourth year students. A background in International Relations and basic International Economics is helpful, but is not formally required. To ensure high levels of participation, the size of the seminar is restricted. Students are expected to be highly motivated and willing to do some extra work.

Course Format: The format of the course will be one seminar per week. Although short lectures may be included in the course, the bulk of the seminar will be devoted to debates and discussions. For that reason, it is critical that all students COME PREPARED. The most effective preparation consists in drafting on a piece of paper the questions and arguments presented in each of the articles. It is also good to think about your own position ahead of time.

Does Globalization represent a fundamental break in international politics? How did it come about and what was the role of politics? Has globalization changed the role and power of states? Have citizens lost the ability to make crucial social choices through the domestic democratic process?

This seminar explores the range of current political debates on globalization. It seeks to unpack the various components of globalization so as to identify their precise nature, origins, and diverse consequences. The seminar also aims at separating out purely economic phenomena from social and political processes. It emphasizes the role of politics, both at the domestic and international levels, and identifies areas where political choice is crucial. This seminar thus probes the intersection between international relations and comparative politics and tests theories from both sub-fields over a range of critical issues of international political economy. There are no lectures and seminar participants are encouraged to engage in lively debates over the different issues explored.

                The course begins with a review of the core debates on economic globalization: trade, capital flows, the emergence of multinational corporations, and the impact of information technology. In particular, critical topics explored in this section include:

                • The nature of globalization in the 1990s and its key components

                • The similarities and differences between globalization in the 1990s and in the 1920s

The second part of the course focuses on the ongoing political debates about globalization: globalization and social equity, globalization and environment, globalization and GMOs, globalization and democratic deficit / rising populism. This section also studies the emergence of anti-globalization NGOs and their impact. Furthermore, the seminar analyzes globalization debates in the applied context of financial crises.

Topics covered include:

                • Globalization and the crisis of inequality

                • Globalization and democracy – rising populism

                • The age of Internet, Social Media, and Rising social voices: political consequences

                • Globalization and development

                • Lessons from the 1997 Asian Crisis and of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis

                • Global Systemic Challenges: Climate Change, Energy, Food, Demography

                • The debate over the governance of Genetically Modified Foods

                • Global climate change: challenge of global commons and democratic conundrum

                • Globalization and Global Governance

POLI 464B/564B (3)    SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Section 001  1st Term  T  13:00 – 16:00

Instructor: Erin Baines
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites:

The course focuses on the question of remaking the social and political after mass violence, atrocity or periods of repression. We will take cue from Bronwyn Leebaw’s Judging State Sponsored Violence, who argues that transitional justice has been too narrowly focused on singular issues, failing to address the complexity of violence and problematically reiterating a victim-perpetrator framework. Recent debate has already begun to complicate the concept of victims, asking who victims are, and who defines this. How does the field simultaneously politicize and de-politicize victims in the pursuit of justice? How to best represent victims in mechanisms designed to promote justice? What alternatives exist? What role to perpetrators play in transitional justice? What is the responsibility of ordinary citizens? Formal and informal transitional justice mechanisms are considered, threading together theoretical critique and empirical case studies.


POLI 464C  (3)       PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Section 001   1st Term  W  10:00 – 13:00
Section 002   2nd Term  W   9:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Robert Farkasch
Required Texts: TBA
Prerequisites:

This course studies the relationship between politics and economics in order to understand the process of late development -both theoretically and empirically. Specifically, we will study questions such as: How important are political institutions to economic development and what role do they play? How does economics affect political institutions and government policies? Why do inefficient and/or harmful institutions survive? Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. We will also examine the economic effects of different growth strategies in Latin America, Africa and East Asia, and investigate some of the pitfalls of natural resource wealth and the difficulties of foreign aid.


POLI 492 (12)                      HONOURS THESIS

Section 001  1st Term  W   14:00 – 17:00
Section 001  2nd Term W   14:00 – 17:00

Instructor: Richard Johnston
Required Texts: None.  Teaching materials online.

Prerequisites: Admission to Honours program

Essays and Exams: Original 35-page research essay on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. 10% of the grade based on participation in class.

This is a seminar designed to help you deliver a thesis that is appropriate and on time. You will learn some basic analytic and editorial skills and how to select and frame a topic. You will be guided through editorial milestones, culminating in the presentation and defense of the thesis at the end of the second term. You will also be assigned to a co-supervisor who is an expert in the field of your chosen thesis.