Kenny Ie

Sessional Lecturer

Research Area

Education

PhD, University of Western Ontario, 2018
MA, McGill University, 2011
BA, Simon Fraser University, 2008

About

Dr. Kenny William Ie is a Sessional Lecturer in the department of political science at the University of British Columbia, where he has been teaching since 2017. His research and teaching interests are in Canadian Politics, focusing on political leadership and executive institutions.


Research

My main area of current research is cabinet, one of the core executive decision-making arenas in parliamentary systems. I’m interested in the processes of cabinet decision-making, representation within cabinet structure, and how prime ministers and party leaders use cabinet to achieve their goals. I’m especially interested in cabinet committees: groups of cabinet ministers assigned to specific policy or coordination responsibilities. I’ve published an article assessing cabinet committees as strategic tools of prime ministerial leadership, and a recent article in the Canadian Journal Of Political Science examining gender and regional representation and their relationship to influence within cabinet committees.


Publications

  1. Representation and Ministerial Influence on Cabinet Committees in Canada. Forthcoming in Canadian Journal of Political Science.
  2. Tweeting Power: The Communication of Leadership Roles on Prime Ministers’ Twitter. Politics and Governance 8.1. 158-170.
  3. Cabinet Committees as Strategies of Prime Ministerial Leadership in Canada, 2003-2019. Commonwealth and Comparative Politics 57.4: 466-486.

Awards

2016-17. Canadian Study of Parliament Group Doctoral Fellowship

2015-16. Social Science and Humanities Research Council Canada Doctoral Scholarship

2013-15. Ontario Graduate Scholarship


Kenny Ie

Sessional Lecturer

PhD, University of Western Ontario, 2018
MA, McGill University, 2011
BA, Simon Fraser University, 2008

Dr. Kenny William Ie is a Sessional Lecturer in the department of political science at the University of British Columbia, where he has been teaching since 2017. His research and teaching interests are in Canadian Politics, focusing on political leadership and executive institutions.

My main area of current research is cabinet, one of the core executive decision-making arenas in parliamentary systems. I’m interested in the processes of cabinet decision-making, representation within cabinet structure, and how prime ministers and party leaders use cabinet to achieve their goals. I'm especially interested in cabinet committees: groups of cabinet ministers assigned to specific policy or coordination responsibilities. I’ve published an article assessing cabinet committees as strategic tools of prime ministerial leadership, and a recent article in the Canadian Journal Of Political Science examining gender and regional representation and their relationship to influence within cabinet committees.

  1. Representation and Ministerial Influence on Cabinet Committees in Canada. Forthcoming in Canadian Journal of Political Science.
  2. Tweeting Power: The Communication of Leadership Roles on Prime Ministers’ Twitter. Politics and Governance 8.1. 158-170.
  3. Cabinet Committees as Strategies of Prime Ministerial Leadership in Canada, 2003-2019. Commonwealth and Comparative Politics 57.4: 466-486.

2016-17. Canadian Study of Parliament Group Doctoral Fellowship

2015-16. Social Science and Humanities Research Council Canada Doctoral Scholarship

2013-15. Ontario Graduate Scholarship

Kenny Ie

Sessional Lecturer

PhD, University of Western Ontario, 2018
MA, McGill University, 2011
BA, Simon Fraser University, 2008

Dr. Kenny William Ie is a Sessional Lecturer in the department of political science at the University of British Columbia, where he has been teaching since 2017. His research and teaching interests are in Canadian Politics, focusing on political leadership and executive institutions.

My main area of current research is cabinet, one of the core executive decision-making arenas in parliamentary systems. I’m interested in the processes of cabinet decision-making, representation within cabinet structure, and how prime ministers and party leaders use cabinet to achieve their goals. I'm especially interested in cabinet committees: groups of cabinet ministers assigned to specific policy or coordination responsibilities. I’ve published an article assessing cabinet committees as strategic tools of prime ministerial leadership, and a recent article in the Canadian Journal Of Political Science examining gender and regional representation and their relationship to influence within cabinet committees.

  1. Representation and Ministerial Influence on Cabinet Committees in Canada. Forthcoming in Canadian Journal of Political Science.
  2. Tweeting Power: The Communication of Leadership Roles on Prime Ministers’ Twitter. Politics and Governance 8.1. 158-170.
  3. Cabinet Committees as Strategies of Prime Ministerial Leadership in Canada, 2003-2019. Commonwealth and Comparative Politics 57.4: 466-486.

2016-17. Canadian Study of Parliament Group Doctoral Fellowship

2015-16. Social Science and Humanities Research Council Canada Doctoral Scholarship

2013-15. Ontario Graduate Scholarship