Courses

Below find all courses that will be offered in our Department for Summer 2017 & Winter 2017-2018 (updated June 2, 2017).

Note:

  • courses are subject to change; please check the Student Service Centre for the most up to date schedule.
  • POLI 360A (Job) is WRITING-INTENSIVE
    • this does not mean a significantly higher workload, it just means lots of practice writing and lots of feedback.
    • we recommend that students take only one WI course per year.
  • if you have any questions, please contact Undergraduate Academic Advisor at 604.822.5969 or the Political Science office at 604.822.6079

 

WINTER POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES 2017-18


POLI 100 (3)         INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS

Section 001   1st term T TH 9:30-11:00
Instructor: Barbara Arneil (barbara.arneil@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:

Note: POLI 100 will be a prerequisite for all 200-level Political Science courses.

Political Science 100 is a course that will introduce you to the key concepts and ideas underpinning modern western politics, as well as contemporary challenges.  It is meant to be an introduction to all four areas of study within political science at UBC:  International Relations, Canadian Politics, Comparative Politics and Political Theory.  The course consists of a combination of lectures, group discussions and readings. Each week you will be required to attend two lectures and one discussion group. Political Science 100 will be divided into two parts. In the first part of the course, we will examine two foundational concepts of modern politics: the state and citizen.  Under this general rubric, we will consider ideas such as ideology, sovereignty, authority, power, rights, and international relations. In the second half of the term we will examine current challenges in the study of politics. Under this rubric, we will examine two central issues that have emerged in contemporary post-modern political life that challenge both the modern state and citizen: globalization and identity politics.  In order to examine how these concepts make a difference in our daily political life, the discussion groups will use contemporary case studies to make the discussion specific, concrete and relevant.

 

POLI 100 (3)         INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS                                

Section 002   1st Term M W F   14:00 – 15:00
Instructor:
Bruce Baum (bruce.baum@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

Note: POLI 100 will be a prerequisite for all 200-level Political Science courses.

Political Science 100 will introduce you to the key concepts and ideas of Western politics, as well as the current challenges.  It is meant to provide you with the analytical tools necessary to study all four areas of political science at UBC: Political Theory, Comparative Politics, International Relations, and Canadian Politics. The course consists of a combination of lectures, group discussions and readings. Each week you will be required to attend two lectures and one discussion group.

Our overall organizing theme will be the ways in which politics involves interrelated struggles for power and justice. Struggles for power – and the uses of power – often seem to obscure or preclude claims of justice; yet the pursuit of justice – even in the most democratic and egalitarian setting possible – always involves issues of power (what it is; who should wield it or how it should be shared; how it should be exercised). With this broad themes in mind the course is organized into five parts: I. Power, Justice, and Politics; II. The Concept of Power; III. Modern Political Ideologies; IV. The Modern (Democratic) State; V. Global Politics.

In order to examine how all of these concepts in western politics make a difference in our daily political life, the discussion group seminars will use contemporary case studies to make the broader themes specific, concrete and relevant.

 

POLI 100 (3)         INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS

Section 003   2nd Term T TH   3:30 – 5:00
Section 004   2nd Term T TH 12:30 – 2:00
Instructor:
Christopher Erickson (chris.erickson@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:

Political Science 100 will introduce you to key concepts and ideas of western politics, as well as current challenges. It is meant to provide you with the analytical tools necessary to study political science at UBC. The course consists of a combination of lectures, group discussions and readings. Each week you will be required to attend 3 one-hour lectures and a one-hour tutorial group. We will begin with an introduction to some of the basic conceptual and theoretical tools you will require as a political scientist. We will then move on to a discussion of some of the important political systems and processes. The course will conclude with a look at politics between states. The study of politics must always keep its eye towards tangible, day-to-day, on the ground events and the discussion groups will in part work towards the practical application of the course material.

 

POLI 101 (3)         THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA               

Section 001   1st Term M W F 12:00 – 13:00
Instructor:
Allan Craigie (allan.craigie@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

The Canadian state presents a unique opportunity to explore politics within one of the world’s oldest constitutional democracies.  Canadian politics is not simply about winning elections.  Politics in Canada deals with the basic nature of what Canada is, who we are, and the type of society we want to live in.  The Government of Canada engages students in the exploration of government structures and political cleavages in Canada.  The State, Nationalism and Regionalism, Foreign Affairs, Elections and Political Parties are some of the topics covered.  Students will come away with a strong understanding of the Canadian context, as well as broader political themes, to prepare them for more advanced study within political science.

 

POLI 101 (3)         THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

Section 002   2nd Term T TH 9:30 – 11:00
Instructor:
Christopher Kam (chris.kam@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course examines the structure and operation of Canada’s political system. Understanding the logic of Canada’s institutions will help students to assume their roles as engaged democratic citizens. Class lectures will focus on the principles and institutions of Canada’s political system. Current and historical events will be employed as examples and used as a basis for class and tutorial discussions.

The course involves two lectures per week and attendance at a weekly TA section. The lectures cover material from the text, supplemented by the presentation and discussion of current and historical events. The sections provide an opportunity to review lecture material, go over assignments, and discuss current events.

 

POLI 110 (3)         INVESTIGATING POLITICS: AN INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC POLITICAL ANALYSIS

Section 001   1st Term M W F 10:00 – 11:00
Instructor:
Alan Jacobs (alan.jacobs@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:
POLI 110 is a prerequisite for POLI 380. POLI 380 is a required course for majors.

This course prepares students to engage with the field of political science by introducing them to the basic logic and tools used by political scientists to understand and explain the political world. The course will teach students how political scientists ask answerable questions; how we define key political concepts; how we formulate hypotheses and theories about political dynamics; how we measure the phenomena we want to study; how we think about and assess relationships of cause-and-effect; and how we report our findings to the world. We will consider these issues by examining how political scientists have investigated major questions in domestic and international affairs, such as why ethnic diversity sometimes leads to civil war, whether international intervention can bring about democracy, and how we can determine which country has the best healthcare policies.

 

POLI 110 (3)          INVESTIGATING POLITICS: AN INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC POLITICAL ANALYSIS

Section 002  2nd Term M W F  3:00 – 4:00
Section 003  2nd Term M W F  1:00 – 2:00
Instructor: 
Michael Weaver (mdweaver@uchicago.edu)
Prerequisites: 

This course prepares students to engage with the field of political science by introducing them to the basic logic and tools used by political scientists to understand and explain the political world. The course will teach students how political scientists ask answerable questions; how we define key political concepts; how we formulate hypotheses and theories about political dynamics; how we measure the phenomena we want to study; how we think about and assess relationships of cause-and-effect; and how we report our findings to the world. We will consider these issues by examining how political scientists have investigated major questions in domestic and international affairs, such as why ethnic diversity sometimes leads to civil war, whether international intervention can bring about democracy, and how we can determine which country has the best healthcare policies.

 

POLI 220 (3)         INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Section 001  1st Term T TH 8:00 – 9:30
Instructor:
Christopher Kam (chris.kam@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:
POLI 100

Why are some countries democratic whereas others are dictatorships? Why are elected governments stable in some countries and unstable in others? Why does ethnic conflict flare up in some countries but not others? This course introduces students to the theories and methods that comparative political scientists use to understand questions and answer questions such as these.

 

POLI 240 (3)        CURRENTS OF POLITICAL THOUGHT

Section 001   1st Term M-W-F 4:00 – 5:00
Instructor: Christopher Erickson
(chris.erickson@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:
POLI 100

This course will provide an introduction to some of the major figures of the Western tradition of political thought.  As a means of moving from the familiar to the unfamiliar, the thinkers and themes discussed in the course will be introduced through the lens of Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are. This simple story contains within it a number of questions that are closely related to the central questions of political thought. How did Max become king?  Was he a just king?  Was he a good king? What does it mean that the story all takes place in a dream?   Authors to be discussed include Plato, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Locke, Marx and Nietzsche.

 

POLI 240 (3)         CURRENTS OF POLITICAL THOUGHT

Section 002   2nd Term M W F 10:00-11:00
Instructor: Anna Jurkevics (ajurkevics@gmail.com)
Prerequisite:

This course serves as an introduction to foundational themes and texts in political theory. We will move through three historical moments: 1. Ancient thought and the invention of the polis, 2. Social contract and the birth of the modern state, and 3. The Enlightenment and its critics. In order to understand these three moments and their primary themes, we will read and analyze excerpts from Plato (Dialogues), Aristotle (Politics), Machiavelli (The Prince), Hobbes (Leviathan), Locke (Second Treatise), Rousseau (The Social Contract), Kant (What is Enlightenment?), Marx (On the Jewish Question), Mill (On Liberty), and Nietzsche (Genealogy of Morals). The course will culminate in readings from Max Weber and Hannah Arendt, which will give students a view forward into the challenges and questions of contemporary political theory.

In this course, we will encounter texts in a way—primarily through close reading—which will introduce students to modes of political argument, and help them place political arguments in historical context.

 

POLI 260 (3)          INTERNATIONAL POLITICS

Section 001  1st Term T TH 12:30 – 14:00
Instructor:
Arjun Chowdhury (arjun.chowdhury@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite: Recommended for prospective students of POLI 360-373

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of Global Politics (or International Relations).  Accordingly, the course will examine international relations theory, decision-making analysis, international security and conflict management, the evolution and future of the international economy, development, the role of institutions and non-state actors, globalization, and the politics of climate change.  The course material is oriented toward issues of contemporary.

 

POLI 260 (3)        INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS

Section 002  1st Term M-W-F 13:00 – 14:00
Instructor:
Robert Farkasch (robertfa@mail.ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some of the basic principles of global politics. It is not a course about current events per se though an effort will be made to integrate contemporary events and issues as a way of understanding the world beyond our borders. The lectures and readings will be used to illustrate basic principles that are both historical and contemporary.

 

POLI 260 (3)         INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS

Section 003  2nd Term M-W-F   11:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
Richard Price (richard.price@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:  Recommended for prospective students of POLI 360-373

Many observers seem to have a sense that global politics is in a state of great flux, with global financial crises, the spread of epidemic disease, global climate change, the geopolitics of cyberspace, and new outbreaks of violence whether it be war in the Ukraine or ISIS in the Middle East. This course will examine some of these and other key global political events, situating in them in the context of continuities and change from the past, to investigate what patterns of contemporary global politics might represent fundamental transformations (for which new approaches and new thinking may be required), and what – if anything – resembles the past (lessons from which we can apply today). Students will be introduced to a variety of concepts and theories to use as tools of analysis for world politics. The aim of cultivating such analytical skills of diagnosing the world’s challenges and opportunities is to enable students to think in an informed and critical way about how to address some of the big challenges of our time.

 

POLI 303 (3)         FEDERALISM IN CANADA

Section 002  2nd Term M-W-F 13:00 – 14:00
Instructor:
Allan Craigie (allan.craigie@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: POLI 101

Federalism is a form of organizing decision making which constitutionally divides state power between a central government and regional governments.  Canada is one of only a handful of federal states in the world today.  The Canadian state is a continent-spanning multinational federation whose true nature is a source of great political debate.  Building upon students’ knowledge of Canadian politics and the Canadian state, Federalism in Canada will examine the structures, histories and processes of Canadian federalism within a broad theoretical context to gain in-depth understanding of the continually evolving Canadian federal system. The course culminates in a day-long simulated First Ministers’ Conference.

 

POLI 304 (3)         BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

Section 001  1ST Term M W 9:00 – 10:00
Instructor:
Paul Kopas (paul.kopas@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: POLI 101

 

POLI 308A (3)     ISSUES IN CANADIAN POLITICS

Section 001   1st Term M W F 9:00 – 10:00
Section 002  2nd Term M W F 9:00 – 10:00
Instructor:
  Andrew Owen (andrew.owen@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: POLI 101

This course examines the nature of public opinion in contemporary Canada. The primary focus of this course concerns theoretical claims about factors that influence public opinion and the empirical evidence that supports these claims. We will also discuss how best to conceptualize and measure public opinion and the effects that public opinion has on public policies. By the end of the course students will be able to identify and understand the factors that shape public opinion in Canada and other mature democracies. This course will also help students become more discerning consumers of public opinion data by providing them with the tools needed to critically evaluate claims about public opinion commonly found in media coverage and popular discussions of politics. Much of the reading material for this course involves quantitative analysis of public opinion survey data. Accordingly, students are strongly encouraged to take POLI 380 prior to, or concurrently with, this course.

 

POLI 309 (3)         CANADIAN PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN RIGHTS

Section 001  2nd Term T TH 11:00 – 12:30
Instructor:
 Samuel LaSelva (sam.laselva@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: POLI 101

This course examines key issues in the history, theory and practice of human rights in Canada. The methodological orientation of the course is critical, analytical and philosophical. The main themes of the course include: (A) The Philosophical, Comparative and International Background to Human Rights, (B) Human Rights and the Human Good in the Old and New Canada, (C) Charter Rights and Charter Problems. When appropriate, historical and contemporary Canadian issues are considered in terms of their wider international and comparative contexts.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS: class test; major research essay; final exam

 

POLI 310 (3)         PARLIAMENT AND PARTY: THE STRATEGY OF POLITICS

Section 001  1st Term T TH 11:00 – 12:30
Instructor:
 Christopher Kam (chris.kam@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: POLI 101

 

POLI 320A (3)     GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF THE UNITED STATES

Section 002   2nd Term T TH   11:00 – 12:30
Instructor: 
Gyung-Ho Jeong (gyung-ho.jeong@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course is an introduction to US Politics. We will examine how various agents and institutions inside and outside of government interact with each other. The topics include: the constitution, federalism, civil rights, political institutions (the President, Congress, and the Supreme Court), public opinion, and elections and voting behavior.

 

POLI 320B (3)      GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Section 001 1st Term T R 9:30 – 11:00
Instructor:
Paul Quirk (paul.quirk@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

Why was the US the last developed nation in the world to establish nearly universal health care?  Why does it now face a burden of public debt that threatens the country with long-term decline in prosperity and influence?  On the other hand, why was the U.S. the wealthiest, most powerful, and often most admired country in the world for most of the past century?  And why has it done more than Canada (yes, more!) to address the problem of climate change?

This course analyzes the nature and performance of the policymaking process in US national government.  Topics include:  the role and effects of institutions (especially Congress, the presidency, and the bureaucracy); the influence of interest groups and public opinion; the political causes of economic inequality; and the nature and influence of policy analysis and expert advice.  Policy areas include economic policy, health, environment, “social” issues, and foreign policy.   Leading questions:  Can US government make responsive and intelligent decisions?  What explains the distinctive tendencies of US policies on health, crime, and gay rights?   A major, question throughout is whether the increasingly severe ideological conflict between the Democratic and Republican parties is making US government incapable of solving problems, and leading to national decline.

 

POLI 321A (3)     CHINESE POLITICS & DEVELOPMENT

Section 001  1st Term T TH  15:30 – 17:00
Section 002  2nd Term T TH  17:00 – 18:30
Instructor:
Xiaojun Li (xiaojun.li@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: 3rd year

This course presents an introductory overview of China’s political and economic development from 1949 to the present as well as the challenges that the leadership and average citizens face in China today. Among the topics covered are China’s political institutions, the economy, legal system, corruption, environmental protection, and media and internet control. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

 

POLI 324A (3)     SOUTHEAST ASIAN GOVERNMENTS AND POLITICS

Section 001  2nd Term T TH 15:30 – 17:00
Instructor:
Kai Ostwald (kai.ostwald@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: 

Southeast Asia is one of the world’s most dynamic regions and is nearly unmatched in terms of ethnic, religious, and historical diversity. It is a region that has experienced exceptional growth, but that is also marked by lingering inequalities and areas of grinding poverty. Aside from being a fascinating region for its colorful cultures, coups, and captivating personalities, its experiences offer countless lessons for students of political, social, and economic development.

This course provides a systematic introduction to the countries of both mainland and maritime Southeast Asia. It begins with an overview of the region’s complex history, before examining countries through agency-based, structural, and institutional frameworks. The course touches on a variety of themes including political legitimacy, economic development, national identity, ethnic and other social cleavages, human rights, political Islam, as well as domestic and international security.

 

POLI 327 (3)         EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

Section 001  1st Term M W 8:30 – 10:00
Instructor:
  Kurt Huebner (kurt.huebner@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

The project of European Integration is under siege. The Eurozone crisis radically uncovered problems and contradictions within the project. The outer borders of the EU are under pressure. The UK voted to exit the EU. Radical right-wing parties are on the rise. Do we see the end of the European dream? We will analyze the past, present and future of European Integration from various theoretical perspectives. The course will look in-depth into the institutional mechanisms and the economic-political power structures by o reviewing some of the milestones of the European project. Given the economic impetus of European integration, the course will give particular attention to the creation of a Common Market, the launch of the Euro and its international status as a reserve currency as well as the several rounds of enlargement. We will also look carefully at the EU as a global climate policy actor. Selected country studies will serve as additional empirical anchors for the understanding of the working of the EU. While the course is lecture-oriented, student participation is strongly encouraged and welcome.

 

POLI 328A (3)     TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Section 001  1st Term T TH 12:30 – 14:00
Instructor:
Charles Breton (cbreton@alumni@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

Immigration represents one of the most important challenges faced by modern Western states. On the one hand, it presents policymakers with possible solutions to domestic labour shortages and the fiscal pressures of aging populations. The normative and legal obligations of liberal states also commit their governments to protect those fleeing political persecution and reunite families. On the other hand, public concern about the integration (cultural, economic, social) of these immigrants often makes it a politically risky undertaking. Given what is at stake, the challenges for immigration countries are numerous. They need to foster a sense of belonging among their immigrant population and create an environment in which they will feel welcomed, but they also need to reassure those among their native-born population that feel threatened by immigration whether for economic or cultural reasons. To face these challenges, immigration countries have chosen different paths.

The course seeks to answer three main questions: (1) Why do some individuals react negatively to ethnic diversity? (2) Why are some societies more open to immigration and the diversity it brings? (3) What explains the different paths chosen by different states and what are their consequences? The course structure follows those three questions. The first part gives an overview of research on how individuals react to ethnic diversity (e.g. intergroup attitudes and behaviors). We then move on to an exploration of the causes behind the different ways in which countries have dealt with this diversity. The final part connects the two and looks at the consequences of these policy choices for immigrants and for host populations.

 

POLI 328B (3)      TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS: Politics and Development

Section 001  2nd Term T TH 12:30 – 14:00
Instructor:

Prerequisites:

This course focuses on the interplay between political institutions and economic growth. We will examine how governments shape economic policies and the emergence and expansion of markets, with special attention to the politics of development aid. The first part of the course explores the economic importance of markets and institutions from a comparative perspective. The second part of the course extends these theories to the practice of development aid and includes modules on: i) strategic considerations in the decision to allocate or withhold aid; ii) political determinants of aid effectiveness; and iii) intended and unintended political consequences of development aid.

 

POLI 332 (3)         POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT OF LATIN AMERICA

Section 001  1st Term T TH 12:30 – 14:00
Instructor:
 Maxwell Cameron (max.cameron@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

What are the challenges and opportunities for democratization in Latin America? This course compares patterns of political development—anarchy, oligarchic states, import-substituting industrialization, incorporation via corporatism or populist mobilization, repression, re-democratization and market reform, and shifts to the left—in order to understand differences and similarities among countries in the region. Key themes include inequality and poverty, exclusion of indigenous peoples, violence, problems of representation, and constitutional reform. The course will offer an introduction to concepts and theories in the field of comparative politics, including bureaucratic authoritarianism, clientelism, incorporation, corporatism, populism, transitions to democracy, delegative democracy, vertical and horizontal accountability, and competitive authoritarianism. Includes cases of Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Argentina, Brazil and Chile.

 

 POLI 333A (3)    POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS OF THE UNITED STATES

Section 001   2nd Term T TH   12:30 – 14:00
Instructor: 
Gyung-Ho Jeong (gyung-ho.jeong@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:  TBA

 This course introduces students to the structure and practice of the federal government of the USA. In particular, this course aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the presidency and Congress. This is a demanding course, with a substantial amount of reading. It is imperative that you read all assigned readings before the class for which they are assigned.

POLI 341A (3)     CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY

Section 001  2nd Term M W F   14:00 – 15:00
Instructor:
Bruce Baum (bruce.baum@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

 

POLI 344A (3)     SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT

Section 001  2nd Term TH   17:00 – 20:00
Instructor:
Jennifer Gagnon (jennifer.gagnon@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course takes to heart Socrates’ maxim “know thyself” and strives to study ancient Greek political thought as a way of gaining distance and critical perspective on the ancient world, our own time, and ourselves. Despite obvious differences in society, culture, and technology, the ancient Greeks faced many questions and dilemmas similar to our own. What makes us human? Are democracy and empire compatible? Is free speech a threat to democracy? What does it mean to be a good citizen? When, if ever, is war justified? What forms of violence are glorified or condemned? Throughout the course we will be attentive to the context and history of ancient Greece while always casting an eye towards the present and the question of “what is to be done?” Among the themes that this course will explore are: the transition from Greek city-states, (poleis), to Empire, the claims the state may make on the individual, the relationship of the theatre to politics, and concepts of the self, gender, and violence. We will grapple with these themes through the works of the Greek poets and tragedians, (Homer, Pindar, Sophocles, and Euripides) and the writings of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and others.

 

POLI 345 (3)         GENDER AND POLITICS: POLITICAL THOUGHT AND PRACTICE

Section 001 1st Term W 16:30 – 19:30
Instructor:
Jennifer Gagnon (jennifer.gagnon@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

Why study feminism and gender today? Didn’t the feminist movement achieve all its goals? Isn’t feminism over? Haven’t LGBTQIA+ peoples achieved equality? This course examines not only the past goals and accomplishments of feminist, gender, and queer politics, but also the present and future struggles for these movements. Students will be introduced to the historical and theoretical foundations of feminist theory, gender theory, and queer theory. We will closely examine the interconnectedness of concepts of male, female, gender, race, sex, and power in forms of discrimination and oppression through feminist, gender, and queer critiques of inequality, family, work, health, sexuality, identity, and politics. Because feminist thought, gender politics, and queer theory are not monolithic, we will explore the many different and often conflicting ways that activists and theorists address issues of gender, sexism, inequality, and oppression. Beyond the assumption that gender inequality and sexism are unjust, this course takes no single political perspective. Instead, this course strives to arm students with the critical and analytical skills needed to start seeing, thinking about, and ultimately changing gender inequality and oppression in our world.

 

POLI 347 (3)         LAW AND POLITICAL THEORY

Section 001  1st Term T TH 11:00 – 12:30
Instructor:
  Samuel LaSelva (sam.laselva@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course examines key theories and issues in jurisprudence and political philosophy. Its main concepts and themes include: sovereignty, adjudication, equality rights, free speech and pornography, rights in time of emergency, as well as various critical approaches to law such as legal positivism, American legal realism and Critical Legal Studies.  The orientation of the course is analytical, critical, and dialectical. Students who register in Political Science 347 should have either a background in or an aptitude for political theory and a taste for rigorous (but polite) philosophical argument.

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS: class test; major research essay; final exam

 

POLI 352A (3)     COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF PUBLIC POLICY

Section 1   2nd Term M W F  16:00 – 17:00
Instructor: 
Allan Tupper (allan.tupper@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:

This course provides an overview of an important aspect of policy making – policy implementation and delivery. Among the topics covered are tensions between secrecy, transparency and privacy in modern policy making and privatization, contracting out and the use of hybrid organizations like not for profits and public private partnerships for policy delivery. The changing role of politicians and civil servants are discussed as is the use of advanced computer technologies in governments. Government ethics are explored at length. For example, under what circumstances, if any, should politicians or other policy makers lie? To whom and for what are policy makers accountable?

Examples are primarily derived from North America and Europe but materials about China and other countries are used as well. The course will comprise lectures and class discussions.

 

POLI 360A (3)     SECURITY STUDIES

Section 2   2nd term T R 14:00 – 15:30
Instructor:
Arjun Chowdhury (arjun.chowdhury@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:

Why do people – whether in state armies, rebel groups, or armed gangs – fight each other? We will analyze three types of conflict: interstate wars, intrastate wars, and terrorism. In each case, we will evaluate the causes (why wars happen), the process of wars (how they are fought, how they end), and policy options for dealing with war (how to stop war, or fight them better).

 

POLI 363A (3)     CANADIAN FOREIGN POLICY

Section 001  1st   Term    M W F 10:00 – 11:00
Section 002 2nd Term    T TH 12:30 – 14:00
Instructor:
Allan Craigie (allan.craigie@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course is an analysis of Canadian foreign policy both on important international issues influencing Canada since the 1960s and of the foreign policy making process in Canada. Issues may include defense commitments, economic relations, activities of international organizations, and relations with the US, Europe, USSR, Asia and the Third World. It uses the study of Canadian Foreign Policy to bring greater insight into the nature of both the Canadian state and Canadian democracy.

 

POLI 364A (3)     INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Section 001  1st Term T TH  12:30 – 14:00
Instructor: 
Katharina Coleman (Katharina.coleman@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course examines the roles of intergovernmental organizations and international regimes in contemporary world politics. The first part of the course examines how various theoretical approaches to international relations understand the role(s) of these institutions. The second part introduces several major intergovernmental organizations and international regimes, and examines whether and how they shape international events.

 

POLI 366 (3)         INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

Section 001  1st Term      M W F 9:00 – 10:00
Section 002  2nd Term     M W F 13:00 – 14:00
Instructor:
Robert Farkasch (robertfa@mail.ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course provides an integrated approach to understanding some of the basic themes of the international political economy (IPE). A multi-disciplinary perspective encompassing insights from the modern disciplines of history, sociology, politics and economics will be called upon to better understand and explain the process of globalization. The tension between market pressures to disperse or concentrate various forms of economic activity and state efforts to enhance or resist those pressures is a theme that will run throughout. Whether markets are embedded within or autonomous from political institutions depends on the theoretical perspective employed. An introduction to the economic liberal, realist, and Marxist/alternative perspectives will provide an overview of the underlying issues and competing ideologies that shape the global political economy. The course will then consider issues conventionally associated with the study of IPE including the political economy of international trade, the role of multinational corporations, international finance, and international development. The course then shifts to topics not normally associated with the study of IPE even though their impact is crucial for understanding causality. The impact from migrations and culture on the processes shaping the contemporary global political economy calls for a wider approach to the study of IPE.

 

POLI 367B (3)      INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY & THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM

Section 001   1st Term T TH 14:00 – 15:30
Instructor:
 Robert Crawford (robert.crawford@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite: Poli 260 is recommended but not required

This course examines the origins, development, and current status of theoretical inquiry in world politics. It examines past and unfolding debates over the defining features, core problems, and appropriate theoretical methods and aspirations for International Relations (IR), and critically evaluates the various “schools” of IR identified by its practitioners. The course also traces the pre-disciplinary roots of what is today called “IR theory” in the broader traditions of ancient and modern political philosophy and related fields, offering detailed analysis of the formative era of IR as a self-standing academic discipline in the years following the First World War. While the course is organized around analysis of distinct theories it also seeks to alert students to conflicting views about the nature and limits of knowledge, underlying assumptions about what constitutes the “reality” of world politics, and the intricate ways in which the normative, legal, and practical aspects of international relations are fused. The course does not merely rehearse the major debates that have come to define international relations discourse, but reveals deeper disputes that seem to threaten the very existence of a united, coherent IR discipline. Ultimately, the course makes a case for international relations as an inter discipline that has come to profit from embracing and amalgamating insights from a number of overlapping fields.

 

POLI 369A (3)      ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL SECURITY       

Section 001   2nd Term T TH 14:00 – 15:30
Instructor:
 Robert Crawford (robert.crawford@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:

This course examines the evolving relationship between Multinational Corporations (MNCs), other nonstate actors, and states in the modern era, evaluating the perceived benefits and costs of foreign direct investment in a number of selected countries, regions, and industries. Our primary objectives are to assess the impact of MNCs on the politics, economies, and societies of states, and to evaluate the effectiveness or desirability of various attempts to control, limit, and regulate MNC behaviour. The course traces the political evolution of the MNC from an actor once seen merely as a source of, or threat to, state power, to its emerging status—among the very largest MNCs at least—as agent and participant in global governance. Given the vast number of MNCs, stakeholders, and issues available, special attention is paid to countries, industries, actors, and practices where the potential for political impact and conflict is greatest.

 

POLI 369B (3)      INTERNATIONAL SECURITY: THE POLITICS AND LAW OF OUTER SPACE

Section 001  1st Term M W 14:00 – 15:30
Instructor:
Michael Byers (michael.byers@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

Space is the final frontier for humanity and therefore international relations. Space sees considerable cooperation, including between the United States and Russia on the International Space Station. Yet Space is also increasingly militarized, through the heavy use of Earth imaging and communications satellites and the related development of anti-satellite weapons. Space is an important part of the global economy, involving 100s of billions of dollars of activity annually. Now, rapid technological developments such as reusable rockets are opening the door to Space mining and the eventual colonization of other planets. All these developments create challenges for national and international policy makers. They also cast new light onto the discipline of international relations and its traditional problems and theories.

Evaluation:

  • Optional 4000 to 5000-word mid-term research essay: 50% of final grade.
  • 120-minute final exam: 100% of final grade; 50% of final grade for students opting to write the term paper.


POLI 369D (3)    
ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Section 001  2nd Term M W F 12:00 – 13:00
Instructor:
Robert Farkasch (robertfa@mail.ubc.ca)
Prerequisite: POLI 260 strongly recommended

This course will analyze various aspects of terrorism in both the international and domestic communities including the structure and dynamics of terrorism, terrorist weapons, strategies and tactics, their use of the media, and theories of counterterrorism are all covered. The course will also explore Jihadism/Islamism, a political movement dating from the early-20th century Middle East given the extensive coverage in today’s contemporary media. With its radical interpretations of the Koran, the Muslim holy text, Islamism calls upon its supporters to engage in acts of violence against those in the West and elsewhere who are said to suppress and humiliate Muslims and seek the annihilation of Islam and Islamic civilization. We will seek to explain why Islamists commit acts of violence, draw parallels between Islamism and other forms of terror in the West. The course also asks about the meaning and practice of “state terror”.

 

POLI 373 (3)         ETHICS IN WORLD POLITICS

Section 002  1st Term  M W    11:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
Richard Price (richard.price@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:

Can the world really be made a morally better place? What could you or other actors do about it and how? Students will examine global advocacy campaigns to understand why some efforts at transnational moral change succeed while others fail.

Claiming that a global advocacy campaign is a success implies we agree it is a morally good thing – but many global challenges resist solution because they involve conflicting moral imperatives. Should interventions have been undertaken in Libya or Kosovo? The second part of the course will engage you with different traditions of moral thought in order to provide you with the tools to make judgments about important moral dilemmas. Issues will then be examined in the third part of the course, such as: Who should be allowed to immigrate and where? Is torture ever justifiable, and what constitutes torture? Who should pay for global climate change mitigation?

 

POLI 374A (3)     INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING

Section 001  2nd Term   M W F 2:00 – 3:00
Instructor:
Allen Sens (asens@mail.ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course will introduce students to the theory, evolution, and practice of International Peacekeeping. The course will explore the development of peacekeeping within and outside the United Nations system, and how peacekeeping has evolved as an instrument of conflict management. The diplomatic, organizational, and operational elements of peacekeeping will be examined in detail, with a view to evaluating lessons learned, reform efforts, and the challenges facing current and future operations. Students will be expected to apply this knowledge to evaluate current and future conflicts and peacekeeping operations. Case studies will be used to illustrate course themes.

This course has five core learning objectives. Students will be able to:

  1. Describe the motives behind the creation of past, current, and future peacekeeping missions;
  2. Describe and illustrate the political, organizational, and operational components of peacekeeping missions;
  3. Differentiate between past and current peacekeeping missions, and identify lessons learned from the peacekeeping experience;
  4. Develop project management, final report writing, and presentation competencies; and
  5. Evaluate if, when, and how peacekeeping might be applied to current and future crises, wars, and emergencies.

 

POLI 375A (3)     GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS

Section 001   1st Term   M W F 14:00 – 15:00
Section 002   2nd Term   M W F 15:00 – 16:00
Instructor: 
Peter Dauvergne (peter.dauvergne@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course analyzes the politics of global sustainability and justice, striving for critical thought that integrates both rigorous analysis and ethical reflection. The focus is on the consequences of political discourses, institutions, and power struggles for global ecological change, taking an interdisciplinary approach that does not assume a background in international relations. How, in what ways, and to what extent is global environmental politics making a difference for advancing global sustainability and justice? How and why is this changing over time? What does this suggest for the future? To answer these questions, the course analyzes topics such as the causes and consequences of unsustainable development, the ecological shadows of consumption, the power of environmentalism as a social movement, the social justice consequences of climate change, the contradictions of technology, the effectiveness of international agreements, the rising importance of city-level governance, the eco-business of multinational corporations, and the value of certification and eco-consumerism. The course concludes by assessing the merits of various pathways toward environmental sustainability and social justice.

 

POLI 377 (3)         NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND ARMS CONTROL

Section 001  1st Term T TH 12:30 – 14:00
Instructor:
Allen Sens (asens@mail.ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This team-taught, flexible/blended learning interdisciplinary course will introduce students to the history, politics, and scientific principles and practices of nuclear weapons and nuclear arms control. Nuclear weapons, and nuclear weapons arms control and verification, are subjects that cannot be fully understood or addressed solely through the disciplinary knowledge and methods of the physical and life sciences or the social sciences and humanities. Instead, an interdisciplinary approach is required, which integrates and synthesizes the contributions of the many disciplines engaged in the study of nuclear weapons and arms control efforts. In this course, a special emphasis will be placed on the political issues and debates and the scientific methodologies and verification practices associated with the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

This course has five core learning objectives. Students will be able to:

  1. Describe and analyze the political and social motives behind the creation of nuclear weapons, arms races, proliferation, and arms control;
  2. Describe and apply basic mathematical and scientific principles associated with scale and waves to nuclear weapons, proliferation, and testing;
  3. Analyze the scientific and political dimensions of nuclear weapons arms control and verification, especially in the CTBT/CTBTO context;
  4. Identify and distinguish between key arms control agreements and related organizations;
  5. Develop problem based team project skills, including project management, final report writing, and marketing.

 

POLI 380 (3)         QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Section 001  1st Term M W F 13:00 – 14:00
Section 002  2nd Term M W F  11:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
  Andrew Owen (andrew.owen@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

An Introduction To Quantitative Methods In The Study Of Political Science.

**Note that credit can be obtained for only one of the following courses (you cannot take more than one of the following for credit): STAT 200, 203, BIOL 300, COMM 291, ECON 325, EPSE 482, 483, FRST 231, GEOG 374, KIN 371, POLI 380, PSYC 218, 366, SOCI 328

POLI 390 (6)         HONOURS SEMINAR

Section 001  1st Term  TH  9:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
  Lisa Sundstrom (lisa.sundstrom@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite: Admission to Political Science Honours program

In this honours seminar, we will examine the burgeoning literature and theories on democracy’s role in the world. We begin with the literature on waves of democratization, particularly cases of new democracy in countries since the “third wave” of democratization began in the 1970s. The course will consider different theoretical approaches to processes of democratization, such as the “preconditions” and “transitology” schools, and debates between strategic-actor and structuralist explanations for regime change. It will also examine the roles and importance of various political, economic, and social institutions in encouraging or impeding democratization, with particular attention paid to the role of international factors and the dynamics of international democracy promotion efforts. We conclude by considering contemporary challenges to democracy, including new forms of authoritarianism, nationalism and populism. Lectures and readings will use cases from various countries where processes of change from authoritarian to democratic regimes, and institutionalization of democratic regimes, are taking place.

The course will focus on developing students’ scholarly writing skills as well as developing a sense of shared community in the honours cohort. As such, assignments will emphasize “low-stakes” written reflections on this literature, revision and resubmission of essays, group presentation assignments, and peer-group feedback on one another’s paper proposals.

 

POLI 402A (3)     LAW AND POLITICS OF THE CANADIAN CONSTITUTION

Section 001  2nd Term  TH  14:00 – 17:00
Instructor:
Samuel LaSelva (sam.laselva@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:  POLI 101 and one of POLI 301, POLI 302, POLI 303, POLI 304, POLI 305, POLI 306, POLI 307, POLI 308.

The course examines key problems of the Canadian constitution, with special emphasis on federalism and the Charter of Rights. Its purpose is to encourage philosophical discussion of Canadian constitutional problems, while placing them in historical and comparative perspective. Topics include: the Canadian, British, and American constitutional models; theories of judicial review before and after the Charter; the notwithstanding clause and reasonable limits on rights; free expression and hate literature; multiculturalism and aboriginal rights; equality rights;  emergency powers;  and  foundational questions about secession, federalism, and  political unity under the condition of cultural pluralism.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: two oral presentations with two short essays; a participation mark; a major research essay.

 

POLI 405A/504A (3)   COMPARATIVE PUBLIC MANAGEMENT

Section 001  1st Term  W  14:00 – 17:00
Instructor: 
Allan Tupper (allan.tupper@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: POLI 101 and one of POLI 301, POLI 302, POLI 303, POLI 304, POLI 305, POLI 306, POLI 307, POLI 308.

This course examines the profound changes in the structure, role and processes of public management in modern countries.

Among the topics examined are the power of civil servants, the status of the Weberian welfare state and public management reform.

These themes are examined through comparative analysis of such topics as accountability, government ethics (including dirty hands and many hands problems), alternative service delivery (the delivery of government services by NGOs and/or private firms) and public private partnerships. Other important topics are secrecy, data collection for security purposes, and citizen privacy.

The course focuses on advanced democracies notably EU countries, Canada, the US and Australia. Canadian examples are derived from federal, provincial, municipal and Aboriginal governments.

POLI 405/504 is a seminar with limited enrolment. Student obligations include presentations, short papers and a substantial research essay.

 

POLI 405B (3)      TOPICS IN CANADIAN POLITICS

Section 001  1st Term  TH  9:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
  Andrew Owen (andrew.owen@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: POLI 101 and one of POLI 301, POLI 302, POLI 303, POLI 304, POLI 305, POLI 306, POLI 307, POLI 308.

This seminar course explores one of the defining features of democracy: government responsiveness to public preferences. We will consider the relationship between public opinion and public policy by addressing the following questions: (1) what is public opinion and how closely should public policy reflect public opinion, (2) does public opinion influence public policy, (3) how do different political institutions facilitate or impede the influence of public opinion on policy, and (4) how effective are policy makers’ efforts to influence public opinion. Our discussion of these questions will focus primarily on the Canadian political process but we will also consider findings from other mature democracies. Much of the reading material covered in this course employs quantitative methods. Students are strongly encouraged to take POLI 380 (or equivalent) prior to taking this course. Students will also write empirical research papers that will involve the application of concepts and skills taught in POLI 380.

 

POLI 420B/514B (3)  SEMINAR ON THE POLITICS OF POLICYMAKING IN THE U.S.

Section 001  1st Term  TH  14:30 – 17:30
Instructor:
Paul Quirk (paul.quirk@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:  Two of POLI 220, POLI 320, POLI 321, POLI 322, POLI 323, POLI 324, POLI 325, POLI 326, POLI 327, POLI 328, POLI 329, POLI 330, POLI 331, POLI 332, POLI 333, POLI 350, POLI 351.

This seminar investigates national institutions and policymaking in the US.  Topics include:  Presidential decision making and leadership; the legislative process, representation, and decision making in Congress; the administrative process and bureaucratic policymaking; and the influence of interest groups, experts, public opinion, mass media, and the electorate.  We will analyze policymaking in several policy areas, such as economic management, regulation, health care, trade, immigration, gun control, and foreign policy—with selections partly reflecting student interest.  For context, we will consider general theories of policymaking and some leading works in comparative public policy, and we will make specific comparisons between the US other countries, especially Canada.   A major concern will be to assess the barriers to constructive action in an increasingly polarized political system.  We will use some journalistic sources to undertake some preliminary exploration of policymaking in the Trump presidency.

The course is intended for graduate and undergraduate students; for students with or without prior background in US politics; and for students interested in comparative politics or international relations, as well as those mainly focused on the US.  Assignments and expectations will take into account differences between graduate and undergraduate students in backgrounds and objectives.   Students who have not previously studied US politics will receive adjusted reading assignments in the first few weeks to provide the essential introductory material.

Research papers may use quantitative or qualitative methods, may deal with an institutional or a policy topic, may focus on the U.S alone or in a comparative context, and may focus on earlier or more recent periods (including the first months of the Trump administration).

Requirements:  Regular class participation; frequent very brief writing assignments; a research paper; and a take-home final exam.

 

POLI 420C/516 (3)   SEMINAR ON THE POLITICS OF US FOREIGN POLICYMAKING

Section 001  1st Term  M   09:00  – 12:00
Instructor: 
Gyung-Ho Jeong (gyung-ho.jeong@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: Two of POLI 220, POLI 320, POLI 321, POLI 322, POLI 323, POLI 324, POLI 325, POLI 326, POLI 327, POLI 328, POLI 329, POLI 330, POLI 331, POLI 332, POLI 333, POLI 350, POLI 351.

This is a course on the politics of US foreign policy. We will examine the policymaking process of the U.S. foreign policy: policymaking procedures and the interactions among President, Congress, bureaucrats, political parties, and the public. This course is not a course on international relations. We will not study specific US foreign policies, such as US nuclear policy or US policy toward the Middle East or any region. The class discussion will focus on the readings extensively. Discussion not based on the readings will be discouraged by the instructor.

 

POLI 422A (3)      SELECTED PROBLEMS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Section 001  1st Term  W  16:00 – 19:00
Instructor:
 Farah Shroff (farah.shroff@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:  Two of POLI 220, POLI 320, POLI 321, POLI 322, POLI 323, POLI 324, POLI 325, POLI 326, POLI 327, POLI 328, POLI 329, POLI 330, POLI 331, POLI 332, POLI 333, POLI 350, POLI 351.

This new course will introduce students to global health issues. We will examine political dimensions of health status–the social determinants of health; health disparities based on income and intersecting inequalities such as race, gender/sex, citizenship and so forth; we’ll study education, housing, culture and/or other determinants of health, both in Canada n abroad. Who’s healthy and who’s not? Why? Once the bridges between health and politics have been established we’ll turn our attention to various mechanisms that improve health.

 

POLI 422B (3)        SELECTED PROBLEMS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS: Political Psychology and the Experimental Method

Section 002  2nd Term  W  9:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
Charles Breton (cbreton@alumni.ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:  Two of POLI 220, POLI 320, POLI 321, POLI 322, POLI 323, POLI 324, POLI 325, POLI 326, POLI 327, POLI 328, POLI 329, POLI 330, POLI 331, POLI 332, POLI 333, POLI 350, POLI 351.

The growth of experimental research in Political Science has been phenomenal in recent years and the field of Political Psychology has been at the forefront of this “revolution”. The main objective of this course then is to provide a broad introduction to the experimental method and use political psychology to highlight its different aspects, its potentials, and its limitations. To do so, we will survey most of the major areas of political psychology, while focusing on more recent and groundbreaking experimental work. Readings are selected to reflect the breadth of the field in topics. This includes the role of emotions, socialization, group dynamics, prejudice, and genetic predispositions in explaining political behaviors and attitudes. Readings will also reflect the different forms that experiments can take: experiments in the “field” and in the laboratory, survey experiments, natural experiments.

At the end of this course, students are expected to come up with their own experimental design and should display a good grasp of important concepts in experimental political science such as causal inference, random assignment,  treatment effects (ATE and others), external and internal validity, mediation and moderation, etc. As a 4th year seminar, the class will consist mainly of discussions with some short lectures provided by the instructor. As such, students are expected to play an active role.


POLI 440B (3)       CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY

Section 001  1st Term  TH  14:00 – 17:00
Instructor:
Samuel LaSelva (sam.laselva@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:  Any 6 credits from POLI 240, POLI 340–349.

This course examines some of the most important modern and contemporary political thinkers and their contributions to the theme of “human rights in theory and practice.” It considers the historical origins and philosophical significance of human/natural rights as well as the challenges posed by their critics and by their implementation in a culturally heterogeneous world. Topics include: the moral, legal and philosophical foundations of contemporary human rights; Burke, Bentham and Marx as critics of natural rights; Rawls, Dworkin, Hart and Waldron on the role of rights in liberal constitutional theory;  arguments for and against of socio-economic rights such as the right to welfare;  Sandel and Pateman on the communitarian and radical feminist critique of rights;  religious persecution and religious toleration as issues of human rights; and the fate of human rights in an increasingly violent world. The methodological orientation of the course is normative and analytical. In the seminars, the conversation is dialectical and critical (including self-criticism).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: two oral presentations with two short essays; a participation mark; a major research essay.


POLI 441A/POLI 547 (3)       CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY

Section 001  2nd Term  M  13:00 – 16:00
Instructor:
Glen Coulthard (glen.coulthard@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:  Any 6 credits from POLI 240, POLI 340–349

 

POLI 449A (3)     TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY

Section 002  2nd Term  W  10:00 – 1:00
Instructor:
Chris Erickson (chris.erickson@ubc.ca)
Prerequisite:

Spectres and War Machines: Politics as Major Science

We are living in a time when our models seem not to be keeping pace with our realities.  Some have called this a “postmodern” era.  The critiques that have been put forward by a number of “postmodern” thinkers are reasonably well known, but what happens after the critique ends?  I God and the author alike are “dead”, how do we best live our lives?  What might the reconstructive process implied in the very idea of deconstruction look like?  This course will address the question of how a “postmodern” critique might inform how politics is done.  Participants in the seminar will be asked to probe the question(s) of what the practical implications of postmodern theory might be.  There will be a primary focus on Derrida’s Spectres of Marx and Deleuze and Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus, although outside reading is strongly encouraged.

 

POLI 460A (3)     FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS: THE CANADIAN MILITARY AT HOME AND ABROAD

Section 1 – 1st  Term  TH 10:00-13:00
Instructor:
Allan Craigie (allan.craigie@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: Poli 101 required, Poli 363A recommended

This course explores how Canada, a global middle power, uses its comparatively limited military resources as an instrument of domestic and foreign policy. The role of the military in modern societies will be addressed, before moving on to the complexities of the Canadian Forces. Canadian contributions to international military and humanitarian interventions such as Afghanistan, Haiti, East Timor, the First and Second Iraq Wars, Libya, and the Former Yugoslav Republics will be discussed. Domestic and counter-terror operations will also be explored to better understand civil-military relations in Canada. As well, the relationship between military procurement and regional and industrial development in Canada will be examined focusing on recent topics such as the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy and the debates surrounding the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

The course will be comprised of student led discussions, debates, and presentations; as such it is vital that students come prepared to each and every class. Accordingly, a sizable portion of student evaluation will be based on class participation and student presentations.

Students who enroll in the class should be aware that guest speakers and class excursions may be arranged. A small fee may be required to support these activities and attendance will be mandatory.

 

POLI 460B (3)        FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS

Section 001  1st Term T  17:00 – 20:00
Instructor:
  Paul Evans (paul.evans@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: Two of POLI 260, POLI 360, POLI 361, POLI 362, POLI 363, POLI 364, POLI 365, POLI 366, POLI 367, POLI 368, POLI 369, POLI 370.

The world is being reshaped by the fourth rise of China, its integration into regional production networks and global value chains, its diplomatic and military assets, its deepening role in international institutions, and the persistence of its particular form of authoritarian capitalism.

The seminar addresses several related questions.  What is global China?  What are the implications of its rise for the balance of power as well as international norms, rules and institutions? Is China ready to play a leadership role in a world order that Mr. Trump’s America appears to be unraveling?

Case studies will focus on G20 and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank; the use of force; climate change; cyber security; soft power.  A major theme will be implications for Canada appropriate policy responses.

Advanced knowledge of China and international institutions valuable but not essential.

 

POLI 461 (3)         PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES

Section 001  1st Term  W  9:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
Jenny Peterson (jenny.peterson@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: Two of POLI 260, POLI 360, POLI 361, POLI 362, POLI 363, POLI 364, POLI 365, POLI 366, POLI 367, POLI 368, POLI 369, POLI 370.

Through an exploration of both orthodox and critical approaches to peace, this course will provide students with a range of conceptual tools that can be used to analyze both the nature of peace itself and the various policy interventions aimed at creating it. Students will begin by exploring the supposed differences between ‘problem solving’ vs ‘critical approaches’.  Following this, a range of ideas from the sub-field of critical peace studies will be explored, including critiques of liberalism, non-violent resistance, hybridity, ‘the everyday’, radical disagreement, agonistic politics, the narrative turn in IR and indigenous perspectives.  Students will apply these ideas to a range of case studies (both local and global) with the aim of exploring the relevance of critical perspectives in analyzing different modes of peacebuilding.  Students will also have the opportunity to explore and debate the utility of critical approaches in improving/creating peacebuilding policies.

 

POLI 462/562B (3)          CURRENT ISSUES IN CANADIAN FOREIGN AND DEFENCE POLICY

Section 001   2nd Term  W  9:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
Michael Byers (michael.byers@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: Two of POLI 260, POLI 360, POLI 361, POLI 362, POLI 363, POLI 364, POLI 365, POLI 366, POLI 367, POLI 368, POLI 369, POLI 370.

Canada faces major challenges in foreign and defence policy. The effects of climate change are felt worldwide, from melting sea-ice in the Arctic to droughts and food scarcity in a number of African countries. The age-old scourge of terrorism has returned with force, with the so-called Islamic State being the principal threat today. Civil wars and foreign interventions have generated huge numbers of refugees and other migrants, testing the commitment of developed countries to the right of asylum. A newly unilateral United States, an assertive Russia and an ever-rising China create even more pressures and opportunities. Cyberspace, Outer Space, robotics and artificial intelligence raise new questions of human rights, multilateral cooperation, and international law.

Evaluation:

Three factors are considered for evaluation purposes:

  1. Individual effort, initiative, ingenuity, and teamwork—as expressed through the provision of collegial support and constructive criticism for the work of other students (33 percent);
  2. An oral presentation to a public workshop (33 percent);
  3. A term paper of between 4000-5000 words on a specific issue or insight related to the course focus (33 percent).

 

POLI 463 (3)         THE POLITICS OF INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

Section 001  2nd Term  W  17:00 – 20:00
Instructor:
Brent A. Sutton (brent.sutton@alumni.ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:  Two of POLI 260, POLI 360, POLI 361, POLI 362, POLI 363, POLI 364, POLI 365, POLI 366, POLI 367, POLI 368, POLI 369, POLI 370. 6 credits of ECON are recommended.

International finance is the lifeblood of the global economy.  While economic factors shape much of what happens in international finance, so too do political ones.  After all, it is governments that decide whether to open their capital markets, adopt fixed exchange rates, default on foreign debt, or bailout ailing banks.  This seminar will cover a variety of contemporary issues related to the politics of international finance.  Three key themes run through the seminar: (i) how much state intrusion is desirable to govern global financial markets; (ii) the role of politics in the design and operation of the international financial system; and (iii) the influence of the international finance system on domestic policy choices.  The seminar will engage theoretical perspectives from the literature in international political economy and comparative political economy.  Topics to be covered include: global financial architecture, capital market liberalization, exchange rate regimes, international reserve currencies, financial crises, the global financial safety net, and international financial regulatory standards.  This is a research-intensive seminar with a major paper requirement.  The seminar’s key goal is to provide students with the capabilities to critically assess the political forces and choices shaping international finance.  Of equal importance is for students to acquire practical knowledge of international financial markets, institutions and regulatory practices.  There are no prerequisites but introductory courses in macroeconomics, global politics or international political economy are recommended.

 

POLI 464A (3)      GLOBAL CIVIL SOCIETY AND NGOs IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS

Section 001  2nd Term  T  9:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
  Lisa Sundstrom (lisa.sundstrom@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

This course will examine the growing and changing roles of nongovernmental organizations in international politics. We will ask whether a “global civil society” may be said to exist today, then focus in on the major contemporary organizations that constitute this sphere today: transnationally active nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Fundamental topics for discussion will include how much impact nongovernmental actors have in global governance, the organizational dynamics within and among NGOs, and the positive and negative aspects of NGOs’ global activities. We will spend a number of weeks concentrating on NGO activism in particular sectors, such as human rights and humanitarianism, environment, gender, and development.

The course will contain a mandatory Community Service Learning (CSL) component. The CSL component is aimed at deepening students’ learning and community engagement by placing them in short-term project assignments (20 hours of expected work) with relevant NGOs in Metro Vancouver. The evaluated assignment associated with CSL will be a journal that students write throughout the term, as well as a group presentation at the end of the term, to which community partner organizations will be invited, reflecting upon their CSL experiences and how they relate to the academic course materials.

 

POLI 464B/564B (3)         SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Section 001  1st Term  T  13:00 – 16:00
Instructor:
Erin Baines (erin.baines@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites:

The course focuses on the question of remaking the social and political after mass violence, atrocity or periods of repression. We will take cue from Bronwyn Leebaw’s Judging State Sponsored Violence, who argues that transitional justice has been too narrowly focused on singular issues, failing to address the complexity of violence and problematically reiterating a victim-perpetrator framework. Recent debate has already begun to complicate the concept of victims, asking who victims are, and who defines this. How does the field simultaneously politicize and de-politicize victims in the pursuit of justice? How to best represent victims in mechanisms designed to promote justice? What alternatives exist? What role to perpetrators play in transitional justice? What is the responsibility of ordinary citizens? Formal and informal transitional justice mechanisms are considered, threading together theoretical critique and empirical case studies.

 

POLI 464C (3)      PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Section 001   1st Term W 10:00 – 13:00
Section 002   2nd Term W   9:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
Robert Farkasch
Prerequisites:

This course studies the relationship between politics and economics in order to understand the process of late development -both theoretically and empirically. Specifically, we will study questions such as: How important are political institutions to economic development and what role do they play? How does economics affect political institutions and government policies? Why do inefficient and/or harmful institutions survive? Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. We will also examine the economic effects of different growth strategies in Latin America, Africa and East Asia, and investigate some of the pitfalls of natural resource wealth and the difficulties of foreign aid.

 

POLI 492 (12)      HONOURS THESIS

Section 001  1st Term  T   9:00 – 12:00
Section 001  2nd Term T   9:00 – 12:00
Instructor:
Antje Ellermann (antje.ellermann@ubc.ca)
Prerequisites: Admission to Honours program

This is a seminar designed to help you deliver a thesis that is appropriate and on time. You will learn some basic analytic and editorial skills and how to select and frame a topic. You will be guided through editorial milestones, culminating in the presentation and defense of the thesis at the end of the second term. You will also be assigned to a co-supervisor who is an expert in the field of your chosen thesis.

In consultation with faculty, students develop a research project, report on their project during seminars, give feedback on their fellow students’ projects, and write a thesis.


 

SUMMER COURSES 2017


POLI 100 (3)   INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS

Section 921   1st Term   T TH   09:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Stewart Prest (sprest@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

What are power and justice, and how do we reconcile the two in contemporary society? How do we decide how to govern ourselves? This course asks and attempts to answer these and other central questions in the study of political science today. In doing so, it provides an overview of key concepts, institutions, and challenges in Western politics. Students will also encounter aspects of the four areas studied in political science at UBC: Political Theory, Comparative Politics, Canadian Politics, and International Relations.

Learning in this course consists of a combination of lectures, readings, multimedia presentations, small and large group discussions, assignments, and exams. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to identify, analyze, and understand a variety of political problems facing Canadians and the world, and will have experience applying the core concepts and methods of political science to practical situations of day-to-day politics.

 

POLI 101 (3)   THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA

Section 951   2nd Term   M W   09:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Matthew Byrne (matthew.byrne@alumni.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course introduces students to the political institutions of the Canadian state and the actors that operate within them. Some of the topics include parliament, federalism, the constitution, and electoral systems. Current events and controversies will inform class discussions. Developing an understanding of Canada’s political institutions and their underlying logic will help students to better engage the political processes of which they are a part. Students will also develop a foundation of knowledge which will prepare them for advanced study in political science.


POLI 110 (3)   INVESTIGATING POLITICS: AN INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC POLITICAL ANALYSIS 

Section 921   1st Term   M W   13:00 – 16:00

Instructor: Charles Breton (cbreton@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course prepares students to engage with the field of political science by introducing them to the basic logic and tools used by political scientists to understand and explain the political world. The course will teach students how political scientists ask answerable questions; how we define key political concepts; how we formulate hypotheses and theories about political dynamics; how we measure the phenomena we want to study; how we think about and assess relationships of cause-and-effect; and how we report our findings to the world. We will consider these issues by examining how political scientists have investigated major questions in domestic and international affairs, such as why ethnic diversity sometimes leads to civil war, whether international intervention can bring about democracy, and how we can determine which country has the best healthcare policies


POLI 240 (3)   CURRENTS OF POLITICAL THOUGHT

Section 921   1st Term T TH   14:00 – 15:00

Instructor: Jennifer Gagnon (jennifer.gagnon@ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This courses provides students with an introduction to the field of political theory through a critical exploration of foundational authors, texts, and ideas in the tradition of western political thought. We will focus on three historical periods, represented by the sections on Athens and the Polis, Renaissance and Revolution, and Modernity and its Discontents. Together, we will read works of political theory and political literature by Plato (Republic), Euripides (the Bacchae), Machiavelli (The Prince and The Discourses), Hobbes (The Leviathan), Rousseau (Discourse on Inequality and On the Social Contract), Nietzsche (On the Genealogy of Morals), and Mary Shelley (Frankenstein). We will focus on developing student’s spoken, written, and interpretive skills by emphasizing critical thinking and close-analysis of the readings with an eye towards understanding our present predicament and contemporary political issues.

 

POLI 260 (3)   INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS

Section 951   2nd Term   T TH   09:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Justin Alger (algerj@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of Global Politics (or International Relations).  Accordingly, the course will examine international relations theory, international security and conflict management, the evolution and future of the international economy, development, the role of institutions and non-state actors, globalization, and the politics of climate change.  The course material is oriented toward issues of contemporary and future relevance, and students will be expected to incorporate current issues into their work.

 

POLI 308B (3)   ISSUES IN CANADIAN POLITICS (CSDI: Summer Institute for Future Legislators)

Section 951   2nd Term  

Instructor: Gerald Baier (gerald.baier@ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course blends academic discussion, practitioner insight, and experiential learning to give students an understanding of both the theoretical and practical aspects of legislatures in Canadian democracy. Topics include Legislatures & Legislative Life, Parliamentary Relationships, The Ethical Politician, Working in the House, Communications, Representation, Constituency Service, and Parliamentary Reform. We will explore the role of the individual Member of Parliament/Legislature in influencing legislation and decision making, and the relationship between political parties, individual legislators and the legislature. The major activities of the course involve the three weekend workshops of the Summer Institute for Future Legislators program.

This course has two essential components. The first is the weekend package (three weekends) that students will take alongside members of the wider community. This will take place both at UBC and at the provincial legislature in Victoria. Attendance during these are mandatory and participation is graded. The second is the academic portion which is only for those attending SIFL for UBC credit.

Dates for the Poli 308B seminar are: July 14th, 21st, 28th, and August 4th, from 10:00am to 1:00pm.

The program is run by the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions. Registration in this course is by application only. For more information, and to apply please go here: http://www.democracy.arts.ubc.ca/summer-institute/ or contact CSDI Program Manager, Rebecca Monnerat (rebecca.monnerat@ubc.ca).

 

POLI 321A (3)   INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

Section 951   2nd Term   M W   13:00 – 16:00

Instructor: Yoel Kornreich (yoel.kornreich@gmail.com)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course presents an introduction to China’s political and economic development from 1949 to the present as well as the challenges that the leadership and average citizens face in China today. We begin with a review of China’s long-term trajectory and the particular dilemmas and traumas that China faced at the beginning of the 20th century. We then examine the contours of governance established under Mao’s reign, as well as the political cleavages undergirding the Cultural Revolution. The larger second half of the course focuses on the reform period that began nearly forty years ago, in the fall of 1978. Among the topics covered are China’s political institutions, economy, legal system, education and health systems, corruption, environmental protection, media, Internet, political participation and political reform.

 

POLI 333B (3)   ISSUES IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS: MEDIA AND POLITICS

Section 921   1st Term   T TH   09:00 – 12:00

Instructor: Dominik Stecula (dstecu@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

Mass media play an increasingly important role in politics, and are a central feature of modern representative democracy. Much of our exposure to politics, as well as other important information, comes not from direct experience, but from stories mediated by the press. This course provides an introduction to the themes in the study of mass media and politics, a thriving field of academic research at the time when the media landscape is undergoing immense changes driven by technological progress.

In this course, we will examine the interactions between media and political institutions, actors and processes, in light of theories of journalism, communication and political practice. A major objective of this course is to learn to think in systematic and nuanced ways about the media’s coverage of the political world instead of relying on grotesque simplifications that pervade public thinking about the media and their role in politics. We will carefully examine what the media do well and where they fail. Some of the topics explored in this course include: what role do the media play in a democracy?, how do the media cover politics?, how do the media affect public opinion?, how do they affect policymakers?, are the media biased?, are social media news media?, among others.

The course will focus primarily on the United States and therefore assumes the basic knowledge of the American political system.

 

POLI 373 921 (3) – ETHICS IN WORLD POLITICS

Summer Term 1, Monday/Wednesday, 1-4 pm in BUCH A103

Instructor: Prof. Erickson (chris.erickson@ubc.ca)

It is commonplace to speak about the traditions of International Relations theory as pragmatic guides to statecraft.  It is not difficult to see how the assumptions of realism, for example, are intended to guide the behavior of those in power.  They can also be considered from an ethical perspective. This course will examine the ethical dimensions of the traditions of IR theory.   We will look into the ethical implications of some of the central theoretical traditions of IR, including realism, idealism, Marxism, and various critical, constructivist or post-structural approaches.

 

POLI 464C (3)   PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Section 921   1st Term    M W   09:30 – 12:30

Instructor: Robert Farkasch (robertfa@mail.ubc.ca)
Required Texts:
Prerequisites:

This course studies the relationship between politics and economics in order to understand the process of late development -both theoretically and empirically. Specifically, we will study questions such as: How important are political institutions to economic development and what role do they play? How does economics affect political institutions and government policies? Why do inefficient and/or harmful institutions survive? Topics include the role of the state in alleviating or exacerbating poverty, the politics of industrial policy and planning and the relationship between institutional change and growth. We will also examine the economic effects of different growth strategies in Latin America, Africa and East Asia, and investigate some of the pitfalls of natural resource wealth and the difficulties of foreign aid.